Review: ‘History of Wolves’ by Emily Fridlund

  Wolves, even since the Anglo-Saxon period, have always been symbolic of humanity’s deepest anxieties. Representing the unexplained, lurking on the fringes of society, wolves embody the fear of the unknown. Beginning Madeline’s coming-of-age story, then, with the history of wolves rather than humans, immediately alienates the bildungsroman from traditional ‘growing up’ novels. Instead, Madeline […]

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Review: ‘If Only They Didn’t Speak English’ by Jon Sopel

In the UK, we’ve come to accept that American culture is dominating our lives. From our cuisine and to our literature, to our fashion and our music, there is no escape from the beast that is the United States of America. As a result, it’s not strange to think that we’re similar to those people […]

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Arts at Brainchild: An Interview with Lily Bonesso

Brainchild, set up by a group of friends in 2012, is a festival popping with creative attractions. Held in July at the brilliantly eccentric Bentley Wildfowl and Motor Museum, whose beautiful steam train puffs and toots on a railway track which circles outside the festival space, Brainchild really is one of a kind. Unlike at […]

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Post-Documenta 14, what happens now?

Since Documenta 14 departed from Athens in mid-July, there has been little done to support the foundations laid by this contemporary art celebration and address the issues highlighted. As the summer months roll on, Athenians have begun to leave the mainland for their summer holidays, as one is incapacitated by the stagnant heat. “Nothing happens […]

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Poetry review: ‘milk and honey’ by Rupi Kaur

‘milk and honey’, Kaur’s debut poetry collection, is one of few commercially popular works of poetry in recent years. This is not to say that no other significant or impressive collections of contemporary poetry have been published, but rather that no other has achieved such global popularity. Upon publication, ‘milk and honey’ sold over 1.5 […]

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Award-winning student poet Theophilus Kwek discusses the ocean, identity, and poetry

Safer Waters: Writing from a Distance It’s summer again, and I’ve been thinking about the sea. I often wonder if growing up on an island has meant that I can hear its siren call even here, in landlocked Oxford: a low foghorn sounding up the Thames, rattling the boathouses. Its undertow can be strong, too […]

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Review: The International Man Booker Prize Shortlist

This year’s international man Booker prize shortlist offers a glittering array of intense, often disquieting and always refreshing fiction. These acclaimed works of translated novels are each uniquely singular. Compass by Mathias Énard (France), translated by Charlotte Mandell (US) Mathias Énard is a darling of the French literary canon, winning a series of prestigious Prixs- […]

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Student Poetry: ‘In Memoriam’, composed in the remembrance of the Manchester bombing

In Memoriam   Mother Is crouching looking for her lost children Wondering whether she even had them Knowing that she did and in the grasp of The emptiness remembering the softness Of their cheeks remembering                   OH The hardness that is the emptiness but still She holds on in the terror in the ongoing go […]

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Alberto Giacometti at Tate Modern: ‘I paint and sculpt to get a grip on reality’

In the first large-scale retrospective of his work in the UK in 20 years, Tate Modern exhibition of Giacometti charts his creative development throughout his turbulent lifetime. Alberto Giacometti is one of the most significant artists of the twentieth century, with virtuoso command on different mediums ranging from plaster, wood and bronze sculptures to paintings. […]

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Art with heart: Supporting artists from Oxford’s homeless population

Nationwide, rough sleeping in England has increased by 134% between 2010 and 2015. Oxford has historically had high levels of homelessness with around 55 people counted as rough sleeping in the city at the last official count. Oxford’s homelessness problem partly stems from housing issues: it is the most unaffordable place to live in the […]

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Exhibition: Eduardo Paolozzi at Whitechapel

As one gets off the Tube at Tottenham Court Road Station, it is virtually impossible not to notice the colourful (or ‘in-your-face’, depending on your colour tolerance) mosaics populating the walls. They were created by Eduardo Paolozzi in 1982-84, and were meant to be a ‘surprising constellation of objects and ideas’. The retrospective running until  14th May […]

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Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell talks politics, poetry, and pictures

Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell brought a unique performance to Chipping Norton Literary Festival this week, delivering his personal style of talk through the medium of drawing.  The talk was unusually structured by Riddell answering questions posed by the audience by drawing out his answers sat at a small desk. His working process and final illustrations […]

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Nadiya Hussain opens up about her panic disorder

In a talk yesterday at the Chipping Norton Literature festival, Nadiya Hussain spoke about the recent release of her new book, The Secret Life of the Amir Sisters. She won over the audience within seconds with her unfailing smile and down-to-earth, modest sense of humour: “Thanks for coming!” she said. “I never expect anyone to […]

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