Make America safe again: how many more mass shootings will there have to be before we see change?

A lone gunman fires into a public space, killing innocent victims caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. The next day the nation mourns the victims. ‘Never again’ people say; never again will families have to wake up to the news that their loved ones have been taken away from them. Sound familiar? […]

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Oxford Council’s proposed car ban: expensive, futile, and unnecessary

Data released by the World Health Organisation last year showed that Oxford was one of 11 British cities to breach the limits set for toxic particles known as PM10s – now the city council has decided it is time for a change. In response to this rise in air pollution, the council has announced its […]

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As Kevin Spacey’s house of cards collapses, he hides behind homosexuality

Another facet to the sexual abuse and harassment scandal sweeping through the entertainment industry (and beyond) emerged recently in a BuzzFeed article. The piece contained allegations from the openly gay actor, Anthony Rapp, against the two-time Oscar winning, House of Cards star, Kevin Spacey. During a party in Spacey’s apartment in 1986 when Rapp was […]

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Saudi Arabia’s shifting religious policy: why you should care

There was a time – the early 2000s to be exact – when the fact that the only country the State of Qatar shared a land border with was Saudi Arabia, was a cause for amusement not consternation. Although the tiny peninsular nation could not compare – yet – to the lavish spread that life […]

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Moving the dialogue surrounding Oxbridge BME students beyond Lammy’s ‘social apartheid’ narrative

“Social apartheid”, “fiefdoms of privilege”, “centuries of entrenched privilege” – such are the damning, yet also all too familiar, condemnatory remarks recently aimed at Oxford and Cambridge by MP David Lammy. According to Lammy: “Only one in four Cambridge colleges made offers to black British students in every year between 2010 and 2015 […] And each year […]

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Is there really “social apartheid” in Oxford admissions? – Implications of data uncovered by David Lammy

Ever feel like everyone at Oxford is from London? Or at least say they’re from London so as not to confuse clueless northerners with alien territories such as ‘High Wycombe’, ‘Crawley’, or the most fabled of them all – ‘Guildford’. Well, truth is, that’s because they kind of are. Taking the almost unanimously stretched definition of ‘London’ as meaning all of Greater London and the Southeast, […]

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First Putin, now Xi Jinping: how unlimited power became the ‘in’ thing

If you were to cast your mind back to the finest music of 2002, it’s unlikely that the first thing to come to mind would be a Russian chart topper. That year, a song titled ‘A Man Like Putin”, in which a Russian girl-band sang about how they wanted a man like Vladimir Putin, dominated the Russian charts. Unsurprisingly, it propelled the band to worldwide […]

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Jared O’Mara: sexism, the Labour Party, and the gauging of true repentance

When I saw that Jared O’Mara had been suspended from the Labour party I felt a rush of relief. My only wish was that it had happened even sooner. If we have learnt anything in the last few weeks, it is that women do not feel always safe; we do not feel safe in the workplace, we do not […]

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Freshers’ Week: do a few years make a difference?

Alice Spiers, Graduate  There is a particular breed of fresher roaming the streets of Oxford this October. One that often gets overlooked in the maelstrom of Freshers’ Week t-shirts, VKs, and third years trying to work out if it’s okay to go home with someone the same age as their younger sibling. The graduate fresher. […]

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What the Austrian Election means for the EU

The Austrian elections on 15th October produced an undeniable shift to the right in the country’s politics. Due to a combination of arithmetic and political reasons it appears that the next government will be a coalition of the conservative Austrian People͛s Party (ÖVP) and the populist Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ). Both have adopted a […]

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The Erasmus Programme could be in danger of dying post-Brexit

The Erasmus Programme turns 30 this year, but its future in the UK is in doubt. With no concrete assurances from the government that it will continue to participate in the programme after Brexit, students and academics alike are concerned that the scheme will soon be a thing of the past. Hal Churchman, just back from an Erasmus year […]

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20 years of devolution: has it been a success?

This year marks two decades since the people of both Scotland and Wales voted ‘yes’ to devolution in referendums promised by Labour’s victorious 1997 manifesto. Blair was confident that devolved governments in Scotland and Wales would mean “the Union will be strengthened and the threat of separatism removed”. Since then, major policy areas such as education, health and housing have been dictated in […]

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When is a vote for self-determination legitimate? – Catalonia, Spain and the 1st October referendum

On the 1st of October, Catalonia – one of Spain’s richest regions – had a referendum. It was quickly declared as ‘unconstitutional’ by Constitutional Court of Spain since the country’s 1978 Constitution affirms the ‘unity of the state’ – but this is hardly surprising. What is surprising, however, is that despite the initial excitement and commotion that it inspired, the referendum does […]

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Why do we undervalue junior academics by paying them so little?

Not one to miss a passing bandwagon, Universities Minister Jo Johnson was quick to make hay out of the controversy over vice-chancellors’ gold plated salaries in early September. Their soaring pay is a “real embarrassment for our higher education sector”, according to Johnson, justifying new plans which will see universities required to publish details of […]

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Charlottesville shows us why we still need RMF

Recent violence in Charlottesville, VA, caused by the clashing of white Neo-Nazis and Antifa, the far left anti-fascist group, have proven false the “Post-racial” bubble that some white Americans choose to live in. I use the phrase “proven false” quite ironically, because you would be hard-pressed to find a POC living in America right now […]

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The Tories must remake the case for capitalism

Much has been written about the electoral shock suffered by the Conservatives earlier this year, and how they might recover, if at all. Many proposals have been put forward, including a Conservative equivalent of Momentum and a ‘Tory Glastonbury’. The Conservatives, however, are never going to be cool or counter-cultural. The failure of Activate, which […]

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