Oxford’s newest society: OxHands on Science (OxHOS)

If your Trinity term resolution was to join a new society, you now have one more option. Oxford Hands-On Science (OxHOS) is the newest society around. It was founded to spread science enthusiasm to kids. Next summer, the two week Roadshow (25th June to 10th July) starting with the Oxfordshire Science Festival will bring hands […]

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An old problem, a new solution: the triumph of Oxford students at the international competition in Synthetic Biology

An interdisciplinary team of sixteen science and engineering Oxford undergraduates travelled to the Giant Jamboree to present their project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where they secured a gold medal and were nominated for 5 special awards. iGEM is an international Genetically Engineered Machine competition that aims to produce novel Synthetic Biology-based solutions […]

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Is bacon off the menu? – Reviewing WHO’s Verdict

The media’s huge appetite for publishing reports about newly discovered risk factors for cancer means associations between human diet and carcinogenesis are continuously reaching the headlines. A 2013 ‘systematic cookbook review’ investigated the prolific nature of nutritional epidemiology within the media, with a remarkable 80 per cent of the common ingredients selected at random from […]

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Mechanical Brains

The Blue Brain Project is an attempt to reverse-engineer mammalian brains and create virtual interactive simulations. Its aim is to allow scientists to conduct experiments that cannot be performed in living organisms due to animal testing regulations. The project was founded in May 2005 by the “Swiss Federal Institute of Technology” and headed by Henry […]

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Zuckerberg gives thumbs up for dislike button

We all have that one annoying friend that’s taken over our Facebook newsfeed with tedious updates about their uneventful life. Ever wish you could publicly demonstrate your disdain? You might actually get the opportunity to very soon as Facebook is introducing a Dislike button. A few weeks ago in a Q&A session at Facebook’s headquarters […]

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Ben Goldacre on his work, the future of medicine and his Oxford Career

With his quizzical look and flyaway hair, Ben Goldacre’s departmental photo makes him look every bit the mad scientist, but this scientific polymath (currently an author, broadcaster, doctor and academic) is at the forefront of one of the biggest medical movements in the last 50 years. With the enthusiasm of a Teach First chemistry teacher, he describes himself […]

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Jabujicaba – The Heart of Brazil

In a new e-book, ‘Jabujicaba’, Rosa da Silva delivers a thought-provoking environmental message about the state of the Brazilian rainforest through a powerful, yet subtle story of corrupt politics, covered up disasters, and exploration of the intricacies in the rainforest’s ecology. The book follows Carmen Macedo, a journalist living in London, who upon returning to […]

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Water in the Earth’s interior: evidence found inside diamond

The discovery of a rare mineral called Ringwoodite, buried some 660 kilometres below the Earth’s surface and found formed inside diamonds, confirms the theory that there exist huge reservoirs of water at this depth within our planet. The team of researchers who made the discovery, led by Professor Graham Pearson of the University of Alberta, […]

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How much for your life online?

Does the name Syrian Electronic Army mean anything to you? It certainly does to Microsoft, Ebay, Paypal, Facebook, Twitter, Obama’s website “Organizing for Action”, and dozens of others targeted by the organisation in the past few years. Their most financially damaging assault was the infiltration of the Associated Press’ Twitter account in April 2013. The […]

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Science access programmes: why are they important?

In a training trip on the River Thames in London, Professor Marcus du Sautoy, founder of the mathematics outreach programme Mathemagician, is teaching a few student volunteers how to show that a tetrahedron is more structurally stable than a cube – using bamboo sticks and rubber bands. Mareli Augustyn, Mathemagicians Coordinator and school liaison officer at the […]

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Putting your science ideas across the globe

When we see distinguished scientists being awarded Nobel Prizes on stage, we often think of their hard work and collaboration with their colleagues. However, if there is no money to support them, how can they purchase the chemicals needed for the Haber process to happen? Although many science projects in Oxford are funded by the […]

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