Oscars so Abled? The Overwhelming Frequency of Non-disabled Actors Portraying Disabled Characters

Ever since Dustin Hoffman won the Oscar for Best Actor playing Rain Man, half of Best Actor Oscars have been won by men playing characters with significant disability. The 2018 Academy Awards have recently graced our screens; including Eddie Redmayne’s Oscar-winning performance last year in The Theory of Everything as motor neurone disease (MND) sufferer […]

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Marie Tidball: Oxford West’s Labour candidate on disability, representation, and making change happen

Two days after interviewing Marie, it was announced that she’s Labour’s Parliamentary Candidate for Oxford West and Abingdon. Having spent an hour talking to her, it’s not hard to see why. When we meet at the Story Museum café, she’s fresh from a busy morning of canvassing, supporting her Labour colleagues in the run up […]

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Oxford apologises after stating avoiding eye contact can be racist

The University of Oxford twitter feed has issued an apology for a newsletter which described avoiding eye contact as potentially racist. The apology follows widespread criticism in the press and on social media. The tweet reads: ‘We are sorry that we took no account of other reasons for difference in eye contact and social interaction, […]

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‘Art for the Heart’ at the Oxford Students’ Disability Community

An inclusive society, the Oxford Students’ Disability Community (OSDC) aims to promote understanding of disabilities and to bring together students with, or interested in, disabilities, to support them and to create a space of communication. It must be stressed that, here at OSDC, ‘disability’ is a very broad notion: it is first of all self-defining—namely […]

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A brighter future for those with autism in the workplace

Last week The National Autistic Society’s (NAS) launched its “Too Much Information” campaign, which aims to highlight the employment gap amongst adults with autism. As few as 16% of autistic adults are in full-time paid employment – leaving  the unique and innovative skillset of hundreds of thousands of people on the spectrum untapped. Where businesses […]

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Caramel: Exploring disability and relationships in film

Relationships are complex at the best of times; most films struggle to depict a single relationship in a way that feels fair and realistic. Lebanese director Nadine Labaki rises to this challenge with a delicate and very successful approach. Her film Caramel (2008) seamlessly presents the lives and myriad relationships of a whole group of […]

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Questioning the hegemony of “health-normality”

The 22 November this year will mark the beginning of the UK Disability History Month. Although already five years in the running, Disability History Month is yet to make it onto regular school curricula, or even the latest university reading lists which the initiative affects. And its effects are far reaching indeed – whether you […]

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Beyond the Paralympics: The Crisis in Disability Welfare

Two major events happened in the world of disability this week: firstly, the Paralympic opening ceremony, and secondly, a protest by disabled people outside the Atos headquarters in central London, against the Work Capability Assessment. The first event was widely reported; the second had to wait for a proper treatment until Newsnight at 10.30pm. Needless […]

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Atos Healthcare: Still profiting from misery

Whilst the Olympic opening ceremony, quite fairly, glorified our National Health Service, it is nonetheless worth remembering the real state of affairs for a significant number of Britain’s sick. In April of this year, around 3400 people in Oxford and 10,000 in the county of Oxfordshire were subsisting on Incapacity Benefit (the allowance for those […]

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