Casting an eye over the best of Eurovision

Life

Josh Brown: Conchita Wurst

‘Rise Like a Phoenix’

The ‘hotbed of sodomy’, as declared by Russian state TV, is this year’s unquestionable standout. Conchita Wurst is the drag alter-ego of ex-boyband member Thomas Neuwirth, although, as Eurovision approaches, Wurst has acquired the nickname ‘The Bearded Lady’.

Austria’s Conchita has inspired comical reactions from Europe’s more conservative elements, with Belarus planning to edit her out of the broadcast completely.he ‘hotbed of sodomy’, as declared by Russian state TV, is this year’s unquestionable standout. Conchita Wurst is the drag alter-ego of ex-boyband member Thomas Neuwirth, although, as Eurovision approaches, Wurst has acquired the nickname ‘The Bearded Lady’.

But while Eurovision politics is as entertaining as usual, it’s at risk of overshadowing what is a genuinely great song. ‘Rise Like a Phoenix’ is a bond theme that never was, with the orchestral swagger characteristic of all the best Bassey songs.

The lyrics also toy with Neuwirth’s controversial gender playing: ‘Peering from the mirror / No, that isn’t me / Stranger getting nearer/ Who can this person be?’ The pun being that ‘Conchita’ is a stereotypically female name, but ‘Wurst’, of course. means sausage.

At the time of writing we don’t know if Conchita will win,  so we can only urge Europe to do the right thing, and vote for the Wurst act.

 

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Sachin Croker: Lordi

‘Hard Rock Hallelujah’

Eurovision for most people wouldn’t involve monster masks and heavy metal, but for Finnish rockers Lordi that’s exactly what they brought in 2006.

For those of us tired of tuning in each year to hear abysmal Abba impressions followed by brutal Boyzone imitations followed by novelty polka acts, Lordi were the ultimate breath of fresh air. Their classic, ‘Hard Rock Hallelujah’, was an unashamed love song to pure hard rock magic. Playing in their full costumes showed that not only did Lordi have their music taste in order (unlike basically every other Eurovision entry), they also had a great sense of fun. This can often be the difference between naff rubbish and genuinely enjoyable music (see: Tenacious D).urovision for most people wouldn’t involve monster masks and heavy metal, but for Finnish rockers Lordi that’s exactly what they brought in 2006.

Unsurprisingly Lordi stormed to victory, winning the (at that point) most amount of points ever. Futhermore, once it was then released to the Finnish public it stormed to number one, with Britian proudly charting it at 25.

If there’s one thing that Eurovision needs more of, it’s overblown pyrotechnics and a facetious attitude to anything that isn’t hard rock.

 

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Jake Downs: Buranovskiye Babushki

‘Party for Everybody’

The OUSU building shakes as the Music and Features teams yell out those earth-shattering lines: “Party for everybody! Come on and dance!”.

We all remember our favourite Russian grannies of 2012. Their incredible track, ‘Party for Everybody’, lost out on the Eurovision crown by just 113 points (*cough*). However, for us at OxStu, they were the true winners. Their half-spoken, half-shrieked Slavic-disco anthem is catchy, cultured and catastrophic.he OUSU building shakes as the Music and Features teams yell out those earth-shattering lines: “Party for everybody! Come on and dance!”.

The Udmurtian octet, dressed in what appeared to be “traditional clothing”, were joined onstage by a rotating oven. The lyrics reflect this aesthetic decision: the “grandmothers” sing (in Udmurt) of lighting ovens, baking bread and spreading cloths. Wow.

Hats off to Olga Tuktaryova, the group’s artistic director. You rocked it. No – you killed it, baby.

 

 

 

 

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