Carrie Hope Fletcher is taking the world by storm

Life

In the Musical Theatre domain Carrie Hope Fletcher has become distinguished by her roles as Beth in The War of the Worlds, Eponine in Les Miserables, Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Her most recent role was as Wednesday Addams in the touring production of The Addams Family, for which she was awarded Best Actress in a Musical at the WhatsOnStage awards.

Despite a glowing résumé already firmly under her belt, over the last few years Carrie has proven she has many more strings to her bow. Her longstanding and influential YouTube channel has now grown to over 645,000 subscribers. She is the proud author of three Sunday Times Bestsellers. She has featured in a number of limited season shows, including Alan Menken’s A Christmas Carol and Tom Fletcher’s The Christmasaurus. Most recently, she completed a run of solo concerts at Cadogan Hall in London, to coincide with the launch of her debut solo album, When the Curtain Falls.

Needless to say, Carrie Hope Fletcher has become a creative force to be reckoned with.

 

‘So many people let that [inner] voice dictate all the decisions that they make. They end up being so miserable because they’re not letting their wants and desires win.’

 

Together with the widespread popularity of her creative ventures, Carrie’s remarkably down-to-earth and refreshingly candid approach to life has won her the hearts of thousands of admirers across the world.

In an interview with the BBC she refers to the constant battle with her ‘inner critic’, a feeling no doubt relatable to musicians and non-musicians alike:

‘There’s always that voice in the back of your head that says you’re not good enough […] And those voices are sometimes so loud that it puts a dampener on everything you do. But if you listen to it, you’re never going to do anything. So many people let that voice dictate all the decisions that they make. They end up being so miserable because they’re not letting their wants and desires win.’

Reining in the inner critic is one challenge; controlling the outer critic is another struggle altogether, and for Carrie, online shaming has become an inescapable by-product of balancing a career in the arts with a presence in the social media spotlight. Carrie handles the onslaught of animosity with admirable positivity, striving to foster an online community that encourages kindness and does away with unnecessary criticisms.

 

Across social and creative platforms, Carrie is fast becoming a voice of reason and force for positive action

 

Taking challenges in her stride in all walks of life, Carrie considers her recent run of solo concerts to have been her toughest undertaking yet. ‘When you’re in a show, you have first night nerves,’ she explained in a recent vlog. ‘Things are still in an unstable place. But then that goes […] it just becomes about telling the story as best you possibly can on stage, and nerves are a thing of the past. Concerts are a one-off thing […] You never have time to get rid of those nerves […] You’re just constantly terrified that something’s going to go wrong, and by the time you know something’s not going to go wrong, it’s over.’

In an interview with The Stage, she says, ‘I don’t really like being on stage as myself. On YouTube I’m me, yes, but I’m only performing to the camera. But you fill that room with actual human beings and there’s nothing to hide behind.’

Across social and creative platforms, Carrie is fast becoming a voice of reason and force for positive action. By opening up debates surrounding mental health, the introvert-extrovert dichotomy and body image, to name a few, she is grounding illusions in reality and driving out stereotypes. Though she is by no means alone in this endeavour, she is nonetheless becoming a leading figure in the creative field, paving the way toward a broader-minded and more accepting future in the industry and beyond.

Carrie’s talents are, perhaps not surprisingly, in high demand, performing in The Magic of Animation concert at Cadogan Hall on May 6th, starring in Heathers the Musical as Veronica Sawyer at The Other Palace from June 9th – August 4th, and releasing her fourth book When the Curtain Falls on July 12th. And if the wait is too long, Carrie’s album, also entitled When the Curtain Falls, is available now on iTunes, and is well worth a listen (or several).

Suffice to say, Carrie’s creative energy knows no bounds, and at twenty-five years old, I can only imagine the stories she has yet to tell in the years to come.

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