Check out then check in to The Grand Budapest Hotel

Wes Anderson films share a particular and peculiar flavour. Though subjects range from deep-sea divers to inept thieves, the films have a consistent tone. They are often shot in flat, painterly compositions interspersed with choreographed dolly tracks: the introductory pans in Moonrise Kingdom gliding through Britten’s “Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra”, for example. They […]

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#SaveBBC3 a cause worth watching

The announcement by the Director-General of the BBC that BBC3 will be cut from our screens met with instant Twitter campaign, celebrity backlash and a petition with over 50,000 signatures. Lord Hall confirmed this week that Snog, Marry, Avoid, Ja’mie: Private School Girl and other programmes adored by students everywhere will soon only be available […]

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Top Gear still on the right track

When you approach a new series of the British TV classic Top Gear you perfectly know what to expect: improbable challenges on any type of vehicle with four or more wheels and a steer, funny interviews with celebrities interested in cars, a unique and sarcastic review of the week’s novelties in the automotive world and […]

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Mixed messages from Monuments Men

George Clooney’s fifth feature film is a disappointingly executed rendering of one of those life-affirming true stories in which individuals go above and beyond to make the world better for others. Cinema seems to be good at ferretting these out lately, giving us reluctant heroes/support systems in Steve Coogan’s Martin Sixsmith (Philomena), and Matthew McConaughey’s […]

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Interview: Joshua Oppenheimer

There are few cinematic experiences from the last few years as harrowing as the first time you watch Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Act of Killing. Decorated with the BAFTA for Best Documentary as recently as Sunday, the film is a marvel of surrealistic grotesquery, and its erudite director is extremely forthcoming with his views on it […]

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Rebooted Robocop more alive than dead

Ken Russell called Paul Verhoeven’s original 1987 RoboCop “The greatest science fiction film since Metropolis.” The original is a cult phenomenon loved by fans so given the recent wave of disappointing remakes such as The Day The Earth Stood Still, The Wicker Man, Total Recall, etc. it is understandable that the idea of remaking RoboCop […]

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Philip Seymour Hoffman: Remembered

The news last week that American actor Philip Seymour Hoffman had died of a suspected drug overdose devastated Hollywood and left the international community mourning the loss of an extraordinary talent. Hoffman first truly entered popular consciousness playing insecure microphone-operator and repressed homosexual, Scotty J, in Paul Thomas Anderson’s epic Boogie Nights. Whilst only featuring as […]

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