Review: The Crucible

✮✮✮✮ Director Helgi Clayton’s production of Arthur Miller’s much-celebrated play depicts a harrowing ‘crucible’ of lust, jealousy, superstition, and moral corruption. The audience finds themselves immediately plunged into a world of screaming teenage girls, scandalous dancing and séance to allure the men they fancy. The use of the lighting and music was particularly effective, as […]

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Preview: Ridley’s Choice

Director Jack Saville and writer James P Mannion, the duo behind last year’s Surprise, return with another seemingly familiar tale which plays fast and loose with the rules of reality. Cemented by impressive lead performances, Ridley’s Choice is a multi-layered experiment with the play’s format and is certain to challenge any preconceptions one might have […]

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Review: Henry V

  ✮✮✮✮✮ When the one-man Chorus of Henry V asks at the beginning of the play “Can this cockpit [i.e. the theatre] hold / The vasty fields of France?,” he is addressing a genuine, pragmatic conundrum for the staging of plays in Elizabethan England. How can an audience conjure up the bloody fields of Agincourt with the […]

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Review: Old Times

  ✮✮✮✮ As I amble into the dark little studio of the Burton Taylor theatre, I am greeted with a grand drawing room vision, a table festooned with After-Eights, bottles of whiskey and a book of Picasso, and serenaded by the sweet melodies of Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra. I feel like I […]

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Review: Bouncers

  ✮✮✮ A small space, pounding music, flashing lights. Sound familiar? At the Burton Taylor the cast of John Godber’s Bouncers unapologetically conjures up a night out in a Northern town. From the ritual of getting ready, to the unsteady taxi ride home, snapshots of the night are punctuated by the condescending glare of the […]

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Review: Wingman

✮✮✮ Fresh from the Fringe, Wingman calls itself a ‘new father-son comedy’. It’s a moving piece detailing complicated family dynamics and the potential for forgiveness: the awkward son (Richard Marsh) finds that his mother has passed away, only to be left with his estranged father (Jerome Wright) who hopes to use the funeral and general […]

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Review: Medea

  ✮✮✮✮✮ When confronted with a production of this calibre – so absorbingly relevant, so in tune with our society’s downward-spiralling patterns of destruction – it can come as a shock to remember that Medea was written by a man, Euripides, in the 5th century BC, to be performed by men for an exclusively male […]

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