Halloween gets real in The Death of Maria

✮✮✮✮ As Halloween approaches and the chill of winter starts creeping in, a play about witchcraft and torture seemed fitting as I made the perilous walk via Cornmarket St towards the Burton Taylor Studio. Except the play isn’t really about witchcraft at all, although that is what the titular character Maria (Evie Ioannidi) is accused […]

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Favour found in Foxfinder

The universe of Foxfinder is darkly original…and yet worryingly familiar. Britain, facing apocalyptic food shortages and finding solace in superstition, has fallen under the rule of a theocratic dictatorship which blames foxes (supposedly gifted with supernatural, devilish abilities) for the catastrophe. Austere ‘foxfinders’ with sweeping powers are sent to investigate unproductive farms, to root out […]

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DEBATE: This house would support state funding of drama and the arts

PROPOSITION: Tommo Fowler makes a play to get state sponsoring for the stage Theatre can be roughly split into two categories: commercial and subsidised. Commercial theatre fuses art with the rampant Capitalist machine, while its subsidised cousin relies upon state handouts partially bankrolled by the hundreds of thousands of people who probably have no interest […]

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Spoonface Steinberg forks out a touching performance

✮✮✮✮ The dimly lit, almost claustrophobic studio hosts a cluttered stage, boasting Lego blocks, hangings of vibrant, animated drawings, and a lonely wooden chair. A young girl sits in the middle, intently colouring and seemingly oblivious to the sudden surge of chattering, clamorous baboons which, for her, comprise the audience. She sits patiently, swaying to […]

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Witchcraft and woe in The Death of Maria

Love triangles, it turns out, exist in 17th century baby-eating witch-hunting Germany just as passionately as in teen vampire sagas. Written and directed by 3rd year historian Camilla Rees, the play that proves this, The Death of Maria, revolves around the real figure Maria Hollin from Mindelburg. Accused of witchcraft by the appropriately evil-named Ursula […]

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Tosca hitting all the right notes

✮✮✮✮✮ Upon stepping into the New Theatre, it would have been easy to start noting trite remarks about its hidden splendour, its outlandish décor and, most notably, its sad absence of Oxford students… but dwelling on the location’s form rather than its content would, in this case, be a great injustice. It was Tosca who […]

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An Eventful evening

✮✮✮ A common theme of many shows at this year’s Edinburgh Festival was the difficulties of coming to terms with human acts of outrageous violence. While Yael Farber’s Nirbhaya exposed abuse of women in India and Sean McCafferty’s Quietly confronted the deep-set hostilities still remaining in Northern Ireland, the subject matter of David Greig’s new play, The Events, is the aftermath of […]

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Break the bubble, not bank

You know how people queue for Abercrombie and Fitch, or the iPhone 5? I like to queue for theatre tickets. “Why not just book them online?” demand my parents. Why set the alarm for 7am, or 6am, or even 5.30am?” Several reasons. I’ll try to explain. Most London shows have a policy of holding back […]

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TRV: Macbeth

What: Macbeth What (2.0): Eve Best directs this traditional version of Macbeth at the Globe and, with Joseph Millson as Macbeth, Billy Boyd (Pippin! From Lord of the Rings!) as Banquo and Samantha Spiro as Lady Macbeth, a pretty stellar cast in Renaissance dress presents a pretty safe bet. Where:The Globe How: Groundling tickets for £5 can be booked online (700 […]

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