An Interview with Sam Plumb

Was drama a big part of your life here at Oxford? If so, what drama were you involved in? Is drama important to you generally? I was in about a show a term at Oxford: my highlight as an actor was probably touring The Comedy of Errors to Japan. I also acted a bit outside […]

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The Marriage of Kim K – A Review

It’s impossible to quite describe what happens in Off the Page Production’s The Marriage of Kim K. Every time you think you’ve worked out exactly what the plot is something else in one of the interlocking stories taking place on stage throws you again. The play opens with Kim Kardashian herself (played beautifully well by […]

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Maud – A Review

‘Maud’ is probably my favourite poem in the English language ever. Tennyson often gets bashed even by the most academic types for being “too musical” or for being too patriotic in poems like ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’. Though these criticisms are extremely reductive, the one poem these critics have obviously not looked into […]

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The Picture of Dorian Gray – A Review

Although Oscar Wilde wrote many plays, The Picture of Dorian Gray was his only novel; this stage adaptation of it, at St. Hilda’s Jacqueline du Pre Music Auditorium, should be praised for its restoration of dialogue from Wilde’s original, unedited manuscript. Wilde’s words are perhaps tied for the strongest element of this adaptation with the […]

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Ballyturk – A Preview

Head on down to the Pilch Studio to see the first student production of ‘Ballyturk’ by Enda Walsh, showing this week from Wednesday to Saturday! When going to preview this play, the first thing that struck me is how ambitious it is in fact to want to put on this play in particular: its themes […]

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Mercury Fur – A Review

It’s sometimes all too easy, considering the culture of violence we live in, to watch films and tv programs depicting murder or rape, and feel unmoved, or at least, blank. Jonny Danciger’s production of Mercury Fur however, will not leave you complacent. It’s utterly compelling. Ridley’s dialogue, which is at times utterly poetic, and at […]

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Maud – A Preview

“Come into the garden, Maud, For the black bat, night, has flown, Come into the garden, Maud, I am here at the gate alone; And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad, And the musk of the rose is blown.” So goes an eerie stanza from Alfred Tennyson’s poem ‘Maud’- a dark story of a crazed […]

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Patience – A Review

A member of the delightfully niche performance troupe that is the Oxford University Gilbert and Sullivan Society has just informed me that the society bangs out one big operatic production each term. An impressive number for a student-led group, and if all their shows are as high a standard as their Hilary production, ‘Patience’, they […]

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Cashiered – A Review

One might well say it’s an exciting and empowering time for the role of trans issues in the arts. Notably, the story of the painter Lili Elbe achieved international recognition in ‘The Danish Girl’ and, closer to home, both slots at the Burton Taylor Studio this week have been devoted to pieces of new writing […]

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Binding – A Review

Vlogging is a tricky thing to put on stage, and no play illustrates this better than Binding. A coming of age story about a non-binary teenager figuring themselves out with the aid of a laptop, it oscillates between being painfully truthful and cloyingly cringe-worthy. When it sticks to being a play it’s moving and compelling, but […]

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Coriolanus – A Review

On an exceptionally bitter February night, an audience awaits the opening scene of Coriolanus. Set in Regent’s Park College, the stage is a bare concrete platform, backed onto the Dining Hall. Yet, despite this very bare backdrop, and the limitations of performing a play outside in Hilary Term, it is set to hold an excellent […]

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King Lear – A Review

Walking into Blackwell’s to see Creation Theatre’s King Lear on Monday evening was a surreal experience. The books were all there, yet appeared unfamiliar under the blue stage lights, the customer service sign hidden by a lighting rig, and rows of seating posited between the shelves (“it’s like being in a private box!” as one […]

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Hyperdrive – A Review

The weirdness of the internet is fertile ground for comedy. That’s precisely what the Oxford Imps have delivered with their new show Hyperdrive; an improvised comedy show based on Facebook profiles and Google images rather than drunkenly shouted suggestions. The production team deserves credit for integrating the technology in such an easy, unforced way. It’s […]

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