Coriolanus – A Preview

Walking in on the rehearsals of Coriolanus, directed by Lucy Clarke, I found it hard to believe that the cast still had a week and a half to go before the performance. We don’t often actually appreciate how hard it is for Oxford students to find time in the week, already full to the brim […]

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Triptych – A Review

Josh Dolphin, George McGoldrick and Will Rees make up the 3 constituent parts of the Oxford Revue’s Triptych, their so-called ‘Show with Sound’. So named, and walking into a darkened room with a laptop placed center stage, I was almost expecting to see a parody of a Ruskin student’s installation. But then, as I listened to Rees earnestly reciting from the notebook […]

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Amadeus – A Review

I love obsessive rivalries. I love nemeses. I love characters so filled with hate that their enemies come to mean something much more than they are. For Antonio Salieri, court composer and protagonist of Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus, the famous Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart comes to symbolise not only everything that he is not (impulsive, inspired, a maverick) […]

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Amadeus – A Preview

Most of us know the film Amadeus by Mološ Forman, but few of us are aware that the film is adapted from a play. Regrettably enough. The scenes from the film that we all have in mind are, indeed, given a great punch in the theatre setting: I couldn’t help but notice this when previewing the scene […]

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Constellations – A Review

Set in the round, coloured light is refracted through suspended hexagons onto the small stage. It’s intimate and atmospheric, a perfect reflection of the play itself. Focussing on the relationship between warm, energetic Marianne (portrayed by Shanon Hayes) and easy-going Roland (Callum Lynch), ‘Constellations’ is Nick Payne’s smart and heartfelt play, brought to life by […]

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THARK – A Review

As we waited for Thark to start (it took only a few minutes longer than expected), regaled by smooth jazz played by Remy Oudemans and Sam Adamson, I dropped some great eaves (“One of my dreams, actually, is to take circus lessons”) and became preoccupied with trying to work out if someone sitting across from […]

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Noose – A Review

Since last week’s show at the Burton Taylor Studio, a relatively small change had been made to the arrangement of the audience seating, but it was the first thing that interested me about ‘Noose’. Whether or not it was intentional, the result was to allow the acting space, connected to the thin gap through the audience that constituted the actors’ only entrance […]

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20 Books to Read Before You Turn 20

There is a song, written by Baz Luhrmann, which has become a kind of gospel for millennials (and which you definitely need to listen to before you turn 20). “Everybody’s Free to Wear Sunscreen” is a song from their generation to yours, a song that dispenses timeless wisdom from the lofty heights of those who […]

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RENT – A Review

One might think that Rent, a musical primarily about AIDs victims and starving artists in ‘90s New York City, is a drama worlds away from the dreaming spires. Yet after witnessing this world recreated on Wednesday night at the Oxford Playhouse, audience members streamed out, excitedly discussing its passion and energy. I had high expectations; […]

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THARK: A Preview

Farces are perhaps the hardest of all plays to perform successfully; how does a cast and director balance comic timing, ridiculous lines and quick interchanges while making the script intelligible and, most importantly, funny? Thark, Ben Travers’ play from the 1920s, poses just these challenges to director Jack Bradfield and his 10-strong cast, but luckily, […]

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