Review: The Importance of Being Earnest

“In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity is the vital thing.” And, indeed, St Hilda’s Drama Society brought style to their production of Oscar Wilde’s 1895 The Importance of being Earnest. Wilde’s play is a tale of deception, social obligation, and farce, that lies somewhere between self-parody and deceptively flippant commentary on society and […]

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Review: The Architect

The main problem with The Architect is the play. Ostensibly, it focuses on the life of the has-been architect, Leo Black (Dom Applewhite), who is stuck building car-parks as his marriage collapses around him. The playwright claims the play to be a comment on the tragic naivety of architects of the 60s whose motives and […]

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Iolanthe is Magic

Preposterous, outlandish, and ludicrously absurd, Oxford University’s Gilbert & Sullivan Society’s production of the comic opera Iolanthe is a hilariously entertaining show that will keep audiences in stitches from start to finish. Masterfully directed by Zoe Firth, the performance is a rollicking musical romp among the dimwitted and incompetent ruling class. Poking fun at British […]

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Review: King Lear

“When we are born, we cry that we are come to this great stage of fools”, declares the Fool, garbed in the trappings of a mental patient. He positions the cast—all wearing animal masks—around the dimly-lit stage, and, after tip-toeing around the unsettling figures and adjusting their posture, clicks his fingers to throw us into […]

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Review: Noises Off

✮✮✮✮ Too often, 5th week can become a graveyard shift for Oxford’s events circuit. The B-T struggles to shift whatever’s on that week, clubs empty out earlier, and those who do venture out at night can have the distinct whiff of people drowning their sorrows rather than the enthusiasm of the 1st week revellers who […]

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Review: The Crucible

✮✮✮✮½ Lily Slater’s rendition of Arthur Miller’s play, The Crucible, expounds upon the anxiety, fears, and grief permeating Salem, Massachusetts during the witch trials. The sense of realism the actors manage to achieve often allows them to transcend their fictional roles and permits their indignation towards the cruelty and injustice endured during those trials to […]

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