Review: ‘The Lucky Ones’ by Julianne Pachico

A series of offbeat but polished tales set in Colombia and New York City, Julianne Pachico’s debut short-story collection The Lucky Ones, takes as its impetus the subject of luck, and its division amongst humanity. The seemingly clear-cut distribution of luck in the opening pages is quickly brought into question however, with Pachico often considering […]

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Literary Innovation: Oxford Book Club Review and Panoptica Magazine

The Oxford Book Club The Oxford Book Club is a regular fixture in the Oxford literary scene, providing a popup bookshop run by students. The club is now expanding online in the form of a website in which students can share book reviews and explore new works, facilitated by co-editors Megan Husain, Victor Ajuwon, and […]

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The Tunnel of Silence: the Creative Function of Silence in a Post-truth World

Fifty years ago, The Aesthetics of Silence was published in the multimedia magazine Aspen. In her essay, the writer, teacher, and political activist Susan Sontag examined the myths of silence and emptiness, questioning their creative and generative role. She wrote about a new myth in art: that of art as an antidote to consciousness itself. […]

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Review: ‘All for Nothing’ by Walter Kempowski

Daring and fearless in its subject matter and outlook, All for Nothing, by Walter Kempowski is a sublime historical fiction, translated from the German by Anthea Bell, and appearing in English paperback for the first time last year. Set in East Prussia, in January 1945, Kempowski’s novel details the lives contained within the Georgenhof, an […]

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‘Art for the Heart’ at the Oxford Students’ Disability Community

An inclusive society, the Oxford Students’ Disability Community (OSDC) aims to promote understanding of disabilities and to bring together students with, or interested in, disabilities, to support them and to create a space of communication. It must be stressed that, here at OSDC, ‘disability’ is a very broad notion: it is first of all self-defining—namely […]

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Review: ‘Degas to Picasso’ at the Ashmolean

The Ashmolean’s new feature exhibition Degas to Picasso aims to chart over a century’s worth of artistic change in the movement towards modernism in France. Drawing from the private collection of Ursula and R. Stanley Johnson, the exhibition contrasts new works against those which are more familiar. The range is expansive to the extent that […]

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An Interview with the Oxford Author Victoria Blake

Author of a series of successful books, Victoria Blake was brought up in The Queen’s College, Oxford, where her father, renowned historian Lord Blake, served as the provost from 1968 to 1987. Blake herself read History at Lady Margaret Hall and afterwards worked in law, publishing, and bookselling. Her latest book, Titian’s Boatman, is an […]

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‘Eloquence in Art’: Raphael’s Drawings in the Ashmolean’s Print Room

Walking into the print room in the Ashmolean I was first struck by the room itself – the friendly, musty smell from the old books lining the walls; drawers enticingly entitled ‘Turner’ or ‘Ruskin’; the small semicircle of chairs sitting in front of a table. Our group of twelve were here around a table as […]

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Review: ‘LinguaMania’ at the Ashmolean

In the uncertain global climate of 2017, there is more need than ever for us to celebrate diversity, find common connections and communicate with each other, and what better way to do so than through a shared exploration and appreciation of languages? This was the premise of the Ashmolean Museum’s ‘Live Friday’ programme entitled LinguaMania. […]

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