Beeban Kidron Talks Tech

Director Beeban Kidron is best known for directing Bridget Jones’s Diary: The Edge of Reason.  But Kidron’s new documentary, InRealLife, sees her graduate from granny pants and supermarket wine to provide an incisive analysis of technology in the modern world and the negative consequences of growing up surrounded by technology. Picturehouse celebrated the release with […]

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A Streetcar Named Materialism

  Woody Allen’s new film, Blue Jasmine, gathered a plethora of great reviews deeming it a sign of his return to the top form. The acting is remarkable, and the writing is as great and witty as only Allen can make it. The film seems to have left the audiences with nearly nothing left to […]

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How Macdonald adapts Rosoff

The storming success of The Hunger Games has given audiences a taste for futuristic dystopian narratives, and only made studios thirstier for the financial benefits they can reap. So it’s hardly a surprising time to see an adaptation of Meg Rosoff’s 2004 young adult novel How I Live Now hit screens. American teenager Daisy arrives […]

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An Austentacious comedy

Director Jerusha Hess, producer Stephenie Meyer and novelist Shannon Hale have hit upon the perfect way of sexing up Jane Austen for modern audiences without accruing historical inaccuracies; take a few Austen-obsessed women and send them to an immersive Regency-themed holiday camp, the titular Austenland, where they abandon all mod-cons in order to be chastely […]

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OxStu Emmy Round-up

Well. Wasn’t that all just a bit batshit? The 2013 Primetime Emmy Awards were properly all over the place, with surprise wins aplenty, one too many Breaking Bad-themed dance numbers, and actual Elton John. Happily, I stayed up watching it until approximately 4:13AM so you didn’t have to – here’s all you need to know […]

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Don’t pay for The Call

Halle Berry stars in The Call, a film which some reviewers describe as an exciting ‘edge of your seat’ thriller. She plays Jordan Turner who works at the 911 call-centre and, due to a terrible mistake, is indirectly responsible for the death of one of her callers, a teenage girl attacked during a home invasion. […]

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OxStu’s Emmy Predictions

The Emmys are coming! Though here in the UK that means basically nothing, for aficionados of US television it is very good news. This Sunday, the stars and creators of all your favourite illegally streamed TV shows will take to the red carpet at LA’s Nokia Theatre in order to wear really expensive and impractical […]

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Bella Italia

Paolo Sorrentino’s latest film is both a sumptuous celebration of Rome and a far-reaching satire of the lazy, self-righteous mentality that has infected the self-appointed mid-to-upper tiers of Italian society. The central performance by Sorrentino’s long-time collaborator Toni Servillo is masterful. He balances dry humour and biting cynicism while retaining the ability to move the […]

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Ron Howard in the fast lane

It would be easy to assume, from his roles on television’s Arrested Development, that Ron Howard was and is not that serious a director. Yet a directorial career including Apollo 13,  A Beautiful Mind, Cinderella Man, and Frost/Nixon disproves this instantly – and his new film Rush lives up to that side of curriculum vitae; […]

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About Time for another Curtis hit

From Richard Curtis, the writer of some of Britain’s best loved films (Notting Hill, Love Actually) comes another loveable rom-com which slightly sets itself apart by means of a little bit of magic realism. About Time showcases Curtis’ skill with directing as well as writing; he’s drawn a terrific lead performance from Domhnall Gleeson, who […]

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Miyazaki celebrated

Hayao Miyazaki, co-founder of Studio Ghibli, and probably the most famous Japanese name in the film industry, has announced his retirement.  He has actually “retired” before, in 1997, but to our everlasting good fortune, returned to business with Spirited Away in 2001. Assuming, however, that this time he really will not be gracing our screens […]

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Faxon and Rash lead the Way

From the Oscar-award winning writers of The Descendants (Best Adapted Screenplay, 2012) comes a feel good summer movie, with plenty of sensitive emotional punch. For The Way Way Back  screenwriters Nat Faxon and Jim Rash also step up to the directing plate for the first time, and a fine job is done all round. The […]

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