Poetry Corner

Fascist G n Ds   The pinnacle of vulgarity And although with little familiarity My observations lack clarity Your popularity marks a grave disparity Against something that is actually worth half an ounce of my time   A fascist beast purporting to be a nice creature Displaying all those genial features Plato, Schopenhauer, Kant and […]

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An Atomic Slice of Life

Their tag line is ‘making great pizza isn’t rocket science’. If you venture way down Cowley Road, past it’s mother and infamous burger joint and near the Regal you’ll find Atomic Pizza: a little slice of fun.  They’ve got the same formula going, with comic book characters plastering the walls. But there’s no Frito Bandito, […]

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Britain’s quirkiest film studio

Rosa Schiller-Crawhurst visits eclectic Sands Films. Nestled in amongst an imposing eighteenth century wharf set back from the bank of the Thames in Rotherhithe resides a hive of creative activity. Sands Films is a film production company of a unique nature – it runs its own studio,  costumes, cinema and all the facilities needed to […]

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A Graphic Novel

“Why are you reading that picture book?” asked a friend of mine as he peaked over the top of the heavy graphic novel I held in my hands. Though not particularly eloquent, this was a good question. Why was I reading Craig Thompson’s graphic masterpiece Habibi? I’d never read a graphic novel before.  In fact […]

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Poetry Column

February II   Proud January skipped, forgetting Every lesson from last year, and getting Muddled in memories, premonitions, resolutions, Unsure if now, then, or someday held a solution. He pretended to assimilate, Instead strained to communicate, Demonstrate, extricate, masturbate; Heading to nowhere and finding too late That this year was deader than the last: The […]

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Post-war quirky innovation

Rosa Schiller-Crawhurst explores the latest exhibition at the V&A In 1948 Britain hosted the Olympic Games in a world devastated and torn apart by war. These games became known as the “Austerity Games” and they began to provide the platform for British impetus for change and modernization. The Victoria and Albert Museum’s current exhibition British […]

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Poetry Column

‘Little Clarendon Street’    It wouldn’t be Wednesday without the man in the street, Shouting the big issues of the world, scaring the shit Out of every passer by, With fire in his eyes, And beer on his thighs, And scars on each cheek, but a smile on neither. – It wouldn’t be Thursday, Friday or […]

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Lessons from the old school

Michael Teckman explains his love affair with vinyl. We currently live in a world of debilitating convenience. From the (relative) comfort of our typist’s chairs we can access pretty much everything we’d ever need (once the internet has told us we need it, of course).  No longer do we need to go out to get […]

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