Twelfth Night’s alright

Nick Mutch assesses Twelfth Night – more Shakespeare, in a garden. This production of Twelfth Night could not have had a better setting. The Christ Church cathedral gardens lended the play a beautiful ambience. The fact that it was set at dusk, following the movement of the play itself from dusk to nightfall, gave it […]

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Love me Tender, Love me True…

Love’s Labour’s Lost in Christ Church Cathedral Gardens – reviewed by Arche Cornish. Tommo Fowler’s production of Love’s Labour’s Lost opens with two students in gowns playing croquet. Depending on your attitude to this most English of games, it’s either a money-spinner or a cliché – will this be another play on a lawn with […]

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Kissing the Floor, wanting more

Jack Webb reviews Kissing The Floor at the Moser Theatre. If you are looking for a heart-warming tale of love and its overwhelming power to bring together a comically mismatched couple, this is probably not the play for you. If you are seeking respite from weeks of brain-curdling revision with a light-hearted dramatic interpretation of […]

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Thespalot

Showcasing a day in the life of an Oxford Thesp. This week director Megan Lynch discusses the perils of onstage nudity… How do you ask someone you’ve talked to for a grand total of around eight hours to undress in front of you, with no alcohol as a lubricant and no promise of sexual gratification […]

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New writing? No thanks

 Why I don’t want to see your shit play – some thoughts on the shortcomings of student written theatre, from Frederick Harrisson. The other day a certain Oxford “thesp” addressed his Facebook friends in a plaintive tone. Since I wasn’t in the room when he typed the melancholy message (I’ve never met him, our online […]

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The importance of seeing Earnest

Prithu Banerjee gives his judgement on Exon’s The Importance Of Being Earnest.  The Importance Of Being Earnest is one of the most double-edged swords to take in drama. A ridiculously well-known play with multiple adaptations, there is as much previous material to inspire as there are impossible expectations to fulfil. Which is why it was […]

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Hardly worth The Trip

Tim Bano reviews new writing The Trip at The Cellar. It causes a certain amount of trepidation when a play begins, “So I woke up one morning”. It’s like a song that starts with “I was walking down the street” or a book with “Once upon a time”: clichéd and only really suitable for children […]

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Shipwrecks, Sarcasm and Sausages

Charlotte Lennon reviews Neville’s Island in St Peter’s College Gardens. Gently entertaining, Tim Firth’s “comedy in thick fog”, Neville’s Island, was not written to break barriers or court controversy.  It is unsurprising then, that director Alice Fraser and Megan Lynch’s production is unlikely to do either.  They ought to be congratulated however, on selecting a […]

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Stoop-endously good comedy

Frankie Goodway reviews She Stoops to Conquer at the Keble O’Reilly Theatre. The Trinity Players have chosen a cracking script for their garden play. She Stoops to Conquer is an eighteenth century comedy that invites an audience to chuckle at the misfortunes of two London dandies when they mistake the house they’ve been invited to for an […]

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Thespalot

Showcasing a day in the life of an Oxford Thesp. This week Rebeeca Roughan has let all that Shakespeare get to her head… Friends, Oxonians, Countrymen lend me your ears! By the pricking of my thumbs, the play’s the thing, and there are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered. Music may […]

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The Madness of Mathematics

Chloe Cornish contemplates the integrals and insanity that lie behind David Auburn’s award winning play “Proof”. “I would not dare to say that there is a direct relation between mathematics and madness,” said the mathematician John Nash, “but there is no doubt that great mathematicians suffer from maniacal characteristics, delirium and symptoms of schizophrenia.” Nobel […]

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The only way is Unsex

Oliver Forrest looks at Unsex Me Here in Blackwell’s Bookshop. Unsex Me Here could easily have been something very different. Creator and director Mary Flanigan told me that her initial, quickly altered, idea was something along the lines of “The Vagina Shakespearean Monologues”, with speeches by Shakespeare’s women simply read out on stage. That would […]

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A creepy, crawling production

Maeve Scullion with a first night review of Bug at the Burton Taylor Studio. Bug has the makings of a play around which reviewers would, if feeling generous, throw around the phrase, “couldn’t keep your eyes off”.  Compelling, yes, but this raw black comedy makes for such uncomfortable abrasive viewing that it’s probably more akin to […]

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Let’s Dance

Charting the clash of generations in a decadent Mayfair household and featuring a cast more familiar to the Oxford stage, this revival of Rattigan’s 1939 play ‘After The Dance’ promises to be a polished and professional show. Sick of the careless hedonism of his elders, but dependent on his cousin’s charity, Peter (Jeremy Neumark-Jones) seeks […]

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Thespalot

Showcasing a day in the life of an Oxford Thesp. This week, less than orthodox rehearsal techniques. Can you hear them? They’re whispering, waiting for our arrival. – Who? The audience. As we walk down Cowley road into the sunny cemetery a few streets away from Bullingdon road, I can really see them, chatting and […]

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Shakespeare is my homeboy

As Oxford Shakespeare Festival starts, Megan Lynch defends the Bard and his legacy. Shakespeare in this country is a bit like high culture’s version of conversations about the weather. Fundamentally British and occasionally slightly annoying in the frequency with which it crops up.  Although the bard has been dead for a good four hundred years, […]

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Bard embargo

As the Oxford Shakespeare Festival hits town, James Fennemore explains why he’s had enough of Shakespare – for now. It would be foolish to deny Shakespeare’s aesthetic and cultural greatness. We put on his plays because we know they are good: we enjoy staging them, we enjoy watching them. But repetition brings staleness. We should […]

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Giggles, Gardens and Girls

First, a disclaimer: this reviewer is not completely impartial. I directed the University College Garden Show last year, and it was bloody great. Honest. So how will the Univ Players repeat such blinding success? By the looks of things, with a whole lot of shagging. Director Esme Hicks is clear that a garden show, above […]

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