The Digby Mary Magdalen – A review

One may well have certain expectations when going to see a garden play at the University Church on the life of Mary Magdalen. Whatever they may be, this late afternoon of theatre would not meet them. And that is precisely the merit of this production. It was a truly refreshing way of handling a difficult […]

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Review: ONLIFE

Imagine Black Mirror as written by Samuel Beckett. Dark, clever and deeply emotional, ONLIFE tells the story of one man struggling to deal with modern technology. But while it displays a lot more tech savviness and emotional depth than the average screed about those damn kids and their smartphones, ONLIFE is unfortunately marred by some […]

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Review: Lashing Through the Snow

I never thought of gargoyles as particularly musical creatures. Fortunately, Oxford University’s own acappella group is out to disprove prejudice against mythical creatures with their most recent showing at The Mad Hatter pub, Lashing Through The Snow. A lively assembly of Christmas carols and acappella standards, ‘Lashing’ made for an extremely pleasant evening. While the […]

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Review: The Prophetess

Third week has been insanely good for student drama, and The Prophetess feels like a combination of the week’s biggest barnstormers. Between the heightened emotion and fearful history of Titus Andronicus and the iconic music and bravura style of Singin’ in the Rain lies this production, a classy little number for the Keble O’Reilly, from […]

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As the EU campaigns begin, we lack clarity from all sides

And they’re off! Cue years of leaflets in the letterbox, knocks on the door, and people approaching you on the streets. What do they want to talk about? They’ll be asking you how you’ll be voting in the upcoming referendum on the EU. After you give them the wrong answer, you’ll have to stand there […]

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Liu Bolin: the invisible man?

Photo: dennis crowley If you google Liu Bolin, the results will largely celebrate the playful colour and amusement of his work. Bolin’s recent international success has centred explicitly on just that, ignoring or failing to realise the darker socio-political implications of his creative assertion of erased identity. In fact, Bolin’s first use of the ‘invisible […]

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Review: Why Information Grows by César Hidalgo

Photo: Penguin Books César Hidalgo is a physicist by training, and currently runs the Macro Connections group at MIT’s media lab. His book is (amongst other things) about theories of economic growth. It is not immediately apparent how these are connected. And that’s what makes it such an interesting read. Why Information Grows begins by […]

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Are the Nobel Prizes connecting with readers?

Photo: Anubis3 Jean Paul Sartre was offered the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1964. Famously, he declined, as he declined all official literary honours, stating that writers should not allow themselves to be turned into an institution. Looking at the history of Nobel Prizes, however, one may wonder if the conferment of a Nobel Prize […]

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