William Hogarth’s world view

Born at the end of the 17th century into a period of growing social inequality, William Hogarth’s engravings and paintings are one of the best insights we have into the people’s world of the early Georgian period. Hogarth’s work is more than outwardly critical of the society in which he lives. Each of his engravings […]

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Censorship and the Hugo awards

In order to talk about censorship, I am going to talk about a literary science fiction award. Bear with me on this one. You may have heard of the Hugo Awards, but just to get everyone up to speed, voted on by registered members of the annual convention WorldCon, the Hugos are the most prestigious […]

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On the taboo of nude drawing

For most fine artists, the ability to accurately depict a human body is a critical skill. It seems to follow logically that most developing artists would be glad to practice drawing a figure without the distractions of draping cloth or fussy accessories. However, life drawing classes- which provide these opportunities in a professional setting- remain […]

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Treasures from afar: Camus

“You should perhaps at some point consider reading something post-1300.” Deciding to heed the advice of my grammar tutor and get out the medieval period for a bit, I spent half an hour of the final Friday of Week 8 feeling mildly overwhelmed by the well-stocked French section of St Anne’s library. Telling myself that […]

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Thought for Food: Gee’s

Rarely can a conservatory showcase such sophistication. Somehow, Gee’s manages to transform the otherwise humble into a rather cosy, refined and tranquil setting, almost as if we were dining in a well-to-do Italian family’s stately winter garden. Mille the manager affectionately ushered us in to the bar, where the shelves of spirits and wines glistened […]

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