Review: Dining Al Desko

Dining Al Desko leaps forth with a gleeful nihilism, capturing the very worst of office life in the very best of ways. A comically tragic (or tragically comic?) exploration of high-pressure stress in the world of work, it is a production that succeeds in the difficult task of remaining grounded in a bleak reality while […]

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Review: Hereafter

Life meets death meets virtual life in Hereafter, a new play by Chloë Taylor exploring the inhumane and even inhuman treatment of bereavement in the world of work. Eva (Martha Harlan) is grieving her dead husband when she is called in to work and asked by her boss with a sickening faux empathy to be […]

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Review: A Doll’s House

If you haven’t been to the Michael Pilch theatre before, allow me to set the scene. It is a small space, a black box studio and somewhat dimly lit at the best of times. The audience rows go only three rows back; it is the most intimate of performance spaces. It is also a genius […]

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Medea: a musically enchanting experience

Based on Robin Robertson’s translation of the Greek tragedy by Euripides, Khameleon Productions’ presentation of Medea was nothing short of brilliant. The all-BAME cast and crew brought new life to the myth. The revenge plot of the play, following Medea whose husband, Jason, has abandoned her and their children to marry the princess of the […]

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Review: NSFW at the Pilch

It is difficult to fault Lucy Kirkwood’s NSFW, a play that probes the depths of misogyny with an astute awareness of the painful sexism that journalism perpetuates, but also of the human action behind it. TheatreGoose’s production of the show at the Pilch treats its subject with flawlessly executed precision, wit and sensitivity, unpeeling layers […]

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Review: The White Devil

Stepping into the shadows of Jesus College’s candlelit hall on a sunny Saturday afternoon, the audience find themselves plunged into the equally shadowy world of 17th century Italy, the setting of Webster’s revenge-tragedy The White Devil. Vittoria Corombona, passionately played by Sophie Claypole, falls in love with the Duke of Bracciano (Basil Bowdler) and in […]

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Preview: Amy’s View

In the aisle of Jesus College chapel a few chairs, paintings, table and wine bottles invoke domesticity, setting the scene for Amy’s View by David Hare, this year’s Jesus College production. For a play in which the forces between theatre, television and reality are constantly negotiated it may not be surprising that the set is […]

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Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Brasenose presents ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, a transfixing production of Shakespeare’s most magical tale, staged in the beautiful New Quad for the college’s annual Arts Week. The performance has an airy touch, and a sense of genuine enjoyment underlies the play through the boundless energy of some astoundingly good actors, who shift seamlessly from scene […]

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Lady Gaga meets Brecht at the Old Fire Station

A Berlin Kabaret advertises itself as ‘Lady Gaga meets Brecht’ and a ‘Response to the Refugee Crisis’. It is underselling itself. It is neither of those things but something far more poignant. It is not a ‘response’ or a ‘reaction’ to one specific event. Even with its energy and vibrancy, the performance is never pushed […]

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Confusions: an ordinary Joe takes on a 70s comedy

(Spoilers ahead) Confusions… confusions? Sitting in the front row as the first of three one-act plays began to unfold in front of me, everyone on stage certainly seemed confused. Opening night nerves perhaps? Or more likely the beginning of a consistently engaging and hilarious portrayal of one of Alan Ayckbourn’s ‘greatest works’, or so I’m […]

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