From Dalí to Dior: How Art became Fashionable

The s/s 2018 runways were filled with artistic references and influences, however collaborations between the fashion and art world are by no means a new thing. The formalization of the relationship between the two likely started with Elsa Schiaparelli. Her designs referenced many art movements: Modernism, Futurism, Cubism and Art Deco, and she worked with Jean Cocteau, […]

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Fashion-Art Collaborations Dominate this Spring

This season’s shows were filled with artistic influences, references and collaborations. However, there was no wholesale appropriation of pretty pictures and prints into this year’s pieces. Instead the fashion houses, and the artists that they featured, approached the idea in a more conceptual, political or thematic manner. It did not seem frivolous, or reductive, rather […]

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Five Parisian cinemas that the filmmakers loved

In the 2012 World Cities Culture Report – an international survey examining the cultural offerings of twelve cities – it was revealed that Paris had the highest number of cinemas in the world at 302; almost three times that of London. This hardly comes as a surprise – France is widely considered the birthplace of […]

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Interview with Hugh Welchman

Loving Vincent is the world’s first fully painted feature film. Under the direction of husband-and-wife duo Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, 125 artists worked for six years to produce this animated biographical film about the life and mysterious death of Vincent van Gogh, primarily in the unique and instantly-recognisable painting style of the artist himself. […]

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Carsten Koall/EPA

Does a graffiti museum miss the point?

Abigail Eardley considers the contradictions inherent in the set-up of a graffiti museum. Graffiti is synonymous with being anti-establishment; refusing the common practices of canvas, paint, ornate frame and established art galleries. An art form that often attempts to disassociate from the stifling connotations of art, graffiti is empowered by a distinct apathy towards its […]

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Would Rembrandt have approved of Pollock?: Mockery in the contemporary art industry

Contemporary, abstract art is either appreciated or mocked. Picture yourself in a reputable art gallery, surrounded by timeless, priceless High Renaissance paintings and Pre-Raphaelites; their composition, their techniques and the explicit narrative are utterly exquisite. Imagine your gaze transitioning upwards and landing upon the spectacular Rembrandt ‘The Night Watch”. Its immense, almost overwhelming size, occupies […]

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125 years of Sherlock Holmes: remembering Conan Doyle’s legend

Conan Doyle did not want to be remembered as the man who created Sherlock Holmes: this seems unfortunate, perhaps, when one looks back over the history and extraordinary popularity of the world’s most famous detective. From his first appearance in the Strand in 1887, Holmes, with his (somewhat apocryphal) deerstalker and omnipresent pipe, has remained […]

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Poetry review: the sun and her flowers by Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur’s debut collection ‘milk and honey’ liberated poetry from the archaism of regulated metre and stuffy subject matter. Her fluid and plain style is known for beautifully encapsulating the struggles of heartbreak, femininity and defiance. However, Kaur’s ambrosia formula of abstract sketches and lower case-lettered odes to self-love in ‘milk and honey’ seem at […]

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Oil paintings and iPhone photos: is Instagram the new still life?

It’s mid-June. I’ve just sat my A-levels, and have been whisked away on a family holiday to the world’s cultural epicentre – Florence. Like most tourists, I find myself on a pilgrimage to one of the city’s many cultural trophies: Raphael’s Madonna della seggiola housed in the Palazzo Pitti. What we are confronted with is […]

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Hannah Ryggen, Trump, and the role of media

If just one image epitomizes Trump’s recently concluded tour of Asia, it will be this one: a photo that captures a blockish Yank unceremoniously dumping food into a Japanese goldfish pond, the hosts hiding their horror behind gritted smiles. This was cheap fodder for the liberal media, who quickly lambasted Trump for everything from his […]

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8 fast facts about the 2017 Venice Biennale

Ace the numbers This is already the 57th Venice Biennale. This year, the exhibition has 120 invited artists (85% first-time participants) spanning across a variety of themes such as “Artists and Books”, “Joy and Fear”, “Traditions” and “Colors”. With 86 national pavilions, Antigua and Barbuda, Kiribati and Nigeria are the “freshers” of the event. It […]

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Book review: Stay With Me by Ayòbámi Adébáyò

Without even knowing the plot of Stay With Me, the Baileys-longlisted novel, the first scene acts as a precursor for what is to come. Our yet unnamed narrator waits, anticipating something unknown, in an empty room. Its hollowness is painful, infertile, barren, a physical reminder of Yejide’s loneliness: her inability to conceive, the death of […]

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