Would Rembrandt have approved of Pollock?: Mockery in the contemporary art industry

Contemporary, abstract art is either appreciated or mocked. Picture yourself in a reputable art gallery, surrounded by timeless, priceless High Renaissance paintings and Pre-Raphaelites; their composition, their techniques and the explicit narrative are utterly exquisite. Imagine your gaze transitioning upwards and landing upon the spectacular Rembrandt ‘The Night Watch”. Its immense, almost overwhelming size, occupies […]

Continue Reading

Review: Selection Day

A derisive critique of one of India’s greatest pastimes – cricket – and a powerful satire that deconstructs the deep-rooted ironies of India’s post-modern society, Selection Day is a fictional novel by Aravind Adiga, an Indo-Australian writer and journalist, appearing in paperback for the first time in September 2016. Through the story of two young […]

Continue Reading

John Finnemore: Interview

Did you always want to write comedy or did you have other childhood ambitions? I was quite serious about being a vet at one point. I wasn’t even put off by doing work experience at one, and having to put dead cats in the deep freeze. Having spoken to some vets since, though, I gather […]

Continue Reading

Book Review: High Rise

J.G.Ballard’s High Rise tells the story of the residents of a luxurious forty-storey high-rise. They begin acting out petty grievances but these small acts soon culminate in vivid acts of violence. The start out dropping glass bottles onto each other’s cars and having lots of loud parties, but by the end they have descended into […]

Continue Reading

Review: The Blade Artist

I was lucky enough to see Irvine Welsh speak at the Cambridge Literary Festival a few weeks ago. Now based in Chicago, he was visiting the UK in promotion of his latest novel, The Blade Artist, and, as he told me afterwards, to attend a few key meetings about the production of Trainspotting 2. It […]

Continue Reading

Happy Birthday Shakespeare

On the 22nd April, up and down the country we celebrated the birth of our beloved bard, William Shakespeare. Shakespeare often gets a bad name with school students, because of his arcane vocabulary and the difficulties of trying to appreciate a medium meant to be performed whilst reading it on the page. The dilemmas of […]

Continue Reading

The Best of Brontë

While the 400th anniversary of Shakepeare’s death has received a lot of attention recently, Charlotte Brontë’s 200th birthday has been overlooked by comparison. To compensate, here is a run-down of four of the best screen adaptations of her seminal novel Jane Eyre, so you know which DVD to reach for in order to celebrate in […]

Continue Reading