Would Rembrandt have approved of Pollock?: Mockery in the contemporary art industry

Contemporary, abstract art is either appreciated or mocked. Picture yourself in a reputable art gallery, surrounded by timeless, priceless High Renaissance paintings and Pre-Raphaelites; their composition, their techniques and the explicit narrative are utterly exquisite. Imagine your gaze transitioning upwards and landing upon the spectacular Rembrandt ‘The Night Watch”. Its immense, almost overwhelming size, occupies […]

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Hannah Ryggen, Trump, and the role of media

If just one image epitomizes Trump’s recently concluded tour of Asia, it will be this one: a photo that captures a blockish Yank unceremoniously dumping food into a Japanese goldfish pond, the hosts hiding their horror behind gritted smiles. This was cheap fodder for the liberal media, who quickly lambasted Trump for everything from his […]

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Post-Documenta 14, what happens now?

Since Documenta 14 departed from Athens in mid-July, there has been little done to support the foundations laid by this contemporary art celebration and address the issues highlighted. As the summer months roll on, Athenians have begun to leave the mainland for their summer holidays, as one is incapacitated by the stagnant heat. “Nothing happens […]

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Poetry review: ‘milk and honey’ by Rupi Kaur

‘milk and honey’, Kaur’s debut poetry collection, is one of few commercially popular works of poetry in recent years. This is not to say that no other significant or impressive collections of contemporary poetry have been published, but rather that no other has achieved such global popularity. Upon publication, ‘milk and honey’ sold over 1.5 […]

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Review: Juliet Heslewood’s ‘The Lover Captured’

Juliet Heslewood is an independent art historian who believes that pictures can be read; for her, a painting provides as much of a narrative as a novel, telling stories about the artist’s life, as well as about the painted characters. Her recent lecture at the Ashmolean Museum, ‘The Lover Captured’, offered but one example of […]

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Review: ‘City on Fire’ by Garth Risk Hallberg

Relentless, unique and wildly engaging, City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg is an epic character study set in 1970s New York, a city becoming rapidly enveloped in mystery and descending into chaos. The narrative details the interlinking lives of an intimate group of New Yorkers over a six-month period beginning on New Year’s Eve […]

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