Making pay public: abandoning embarrassment in pursuit of equality

No reasonable person views the recent scandal over pay as raising issues limited to the BBC. Whilst the right-wing tabloids seized upon the opportunity to savage what they deem to be an instrument of the liberal elite, others contemplated a more interesting talking point: how does the just society allocate its resources? This question, at the heart of much contemporary political debate, was just one of those to which Harvard philosopher John […]

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Profile: Mark Gatiss

“I feel like I should be proposing something controversial,” Mark Gatiss confides. Cleanly-cut in stylish gray suit and with an obvious flair for the debonair, it is no great stretch to detect in Gatiss himself the mannerly (if often slightly sinister) gentleman of his defining roles. From top-tier omnipotent government official Mycroft Holmes in Sherlock […]

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Profile: John Cleese

John Cleese’s latest tour titles say it all. The dryness of Alimony Tour (referencing the financial implications of his very public divorce) and Last Time to See Me Before I Die are not exactly tastefully coded. A founding father of British sitcom with the cult classic Fawlty Towers and a writer-performer of the comedy group Monty […]

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Profile: David Pritchard

“I’m not a great fan of cookery programs,” David Pritchard tells me without a hint of irony. “I noticed last week someone is making a tribute to Keith Floyd and the series we made in France – they even bought his old 2CV they say, although I don’t recognise it.” Back in 1982, Pritchard had […]

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Fury as councillors insult LGBTQ community and the homeless

Two Oxford councillors have come under heavy fire this week for comments insulting the LGBTQ community and the homeless. John Tanner, Labour Councillor for Littlemore, branded Oxford’s homeless “a disgrace”, while Julia Gasper, a parish councillor currently affiliated with the English Democrats and previously UKIP, posted a picture of Jimmy Savile to commemorate LGBTQ History […]

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Sherlock: The Science of Devotion

Sherlock has captivated a diverse audience internationally. For many fans, the true value of the show lies not in the cases themselves, but in the layers running beneath the show’s surface. One of the most popular topics amongst Sherlock fans is the relationship between Sherlock Holmes and John Watson, and, more specifically, the idea that […]

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Review: Sherlock Season 4

Nothing beats a good plot twist. Carefully built up to, and seemingly inevitable when revealed, the Good Plot Twist can be engaging, exciting, and satisfying. Sadly, there’s a difference between this variety of the technique (“Who hunts in the middle of a crowd?”) and the sort employed by both kids playing ‘Consequences’, and Moffat in […]

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Termcard Reaction: Jools Holland

Ask a group of people what they think of Jools Holland and you’re unlikely to get the same answer twice. For a few, he’ll be fondly remembered as the bombastic keyboard player in the original line-up of New Wave greats Squeeze. More likely, he’ll be known in his more recent musical incarnations, as a consummate […]

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Inside Ravesoc

If, like me, you’re a child of the noughties, you may remember coming home from school every weekday to watch the CBBC show Raven, in which Scottish actor James Mackenzie guided schoolchildren through increasingly bizarre medieval-themed obstacle courses. While dressed as a raven. It ran for ten series between 2002 and 2010, winning two BAFTAs, […]

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Review: War and Peace

The BBC certainly cannot be criticised for lacking ambition; producing a fresh interpretation of Tolstoy’s magnum opus is no easy task, particularly with scores of previous interpretations already available and a veritable masterpiece as its source. As with any adaptation, the transfer from page to screen meant the risk of losing the original’s charm – […]

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