Nostalgia Review: Disney’s Fantasia

Fantasia. It’s the movie snob’s Disney film of choice, featuring some of the most imaginative and gorgeous animation the studio’s ever produced, set to beautiful classical music. It’s iconic, artistic and groundbreaking in demonstrating the scope of what animation could do and the potential of Disney as a film studio. For me? It taught me […]

Continue Reading

Interview: Hugh Brunt, OUO’s guest conductor

On 13th February OUO performs their termly concert in the Sheldonian Theatre. Continuing on from last term’s massive undertaking of Mahler’s 7th Symphony, OUO will perform Debussy’s Ronde de Printemps from Images, Tchaikovsky’s The Tempest, culminating in Stravinsky’s earth-shattering Rite of Spring. Hugh Brunt, chief conductor of London Contemporary Orchestra (LCO) and alumnus of New […]

Continue Reading

Boulez: A Tribute

On Wednesday, upon hearing the news of the death of the composer, conductor, writer, intellectual, teacher and bon-vivant, Pierre Boulez, the musical world paused to recollect everything that he had given it: not only many dazzling musical masterpieces, and not only a wealth of the highest quality recordings with the best orchestras and ensembles, but […]

Continue Reading

Hitting the right notes

Tyler Hay, a talented 19-year-old pianist studying at the Royal Northern College of Music (studying on a double full scholarship) presented a formidable programme in his recital at St. Catherine’s College Music House last week: Beethoven’s Sonata in E Major Opus 109 and Chopin’s 12 etudes opus 25, both pieces meaning serious business for pianists […]

Continue Reading

Raise a quart to the Piatti

  This young, up-and-coming string quartet have been making waves for a few years now, garnering extensive praise from all corners as well as a pick-and-mix of awards and honours, including, most recently, their second award from the Hattori Foundation for the Music and the Arts. Their performance at the JDP Theatre here in Oxford, […]

Continue Reading

The sophisticated side of pop

Lewis Coenen-Rowe explains why pop and classical music are really the same thing. I turned on the radio the other day and found myself confronted by a wall of noise: an orchestra surging forwards with unstoppable momentum, a mass of sound inexorably rising upwards, violin strings strained to breaking point, the whirr and shriek as […]

Continue Reading

Frankly, it’s between rock and a hard piece

Classical music isn’t broken, but its public image in the United Kingdom needs fixing. Regard the token gestures during the Olympic opening and closing ceremonies: ‘Cellist Julian Lloyd-Webber playing Elgar’s Salut d’Amore, glamorous all girl string quartet Bond accompanying Russell Brand’s off key rendition of I am the Walrus, Rowan Atkinson and the London Symphony […]

Continue Reading