Five underrated classics

1.Cane, Jean Toomer (1923) – Harlem Renaissance author Toomer beautifully interweaves lyric, prose and drama in this series of vignettes written about the cultural history and experiences of African Americans in the United States. These stories are often pervaded by nauseating violence, such as cruel ostracisation in “Becky” or sexual violence in the “Box Seat”, […]

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Feeling So Real: An Ode to Moby

Richard Melville Hall is a man of modest means. Even when he gained a huge amount of critical acclaim for Play, his fifth studio album, the New Yorker remained grounded. In a personally memorable episode of the MTV series ‘Cribs’ around 15 years ago, his humble personality and modest abode provided a remarkably refreshing view […]

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Review: Dining Al Desko

Dining Al Desko leaps forth with a gleeful nihilism, capturing the very worst of office life in the very best of ways. A comically tragic (or tragically comic?) exploration of high-pressure stress in the world of work, it is a production that succeeds in the difficult task of remaining grounded in a bleak reality while […]

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From Jurassic Park to Gladiator – this year’s must-see films in concert

For those unfamiliar with the concept, concert films are film screenings with live orchestral accompaniment. Though the popularity of concert film has rocketed in recent years, they are by no means a recent development. The earliest known concert film was Concert Magic which premiered at the Charlie Chaplin Studios in 1947. Featuring the renowned violinist […]

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A contemplative album requiring an attentive ear: Courtney Barnett delivers a slow burner

The first moments of Courtney Barnett’s latest album, Tell Me How You Really Feel, sound reminiscent of those of ‘Kim’s Caravan’ from her 2015 debut, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. However, unlike the earlier track, which sees the brooding opening guitars become a howling penultimate song, ‘Hopefulessness’ slowly assembles itself […]

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Review: Hereafter

Life meets death meets virtual life in Hereafter, a new play by Chloë Taylor exploring the inhumane and even inhuman treatment of bereavement in the world of work. Eva (Martha Harlan) is grieving her dead husband when she is called in to work and asked by her boss with a sickening faux empathy to be […]

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Review: A Doll’s House

If you haven’t been to the Michael Pilch theatre before, allow me to set the scene. It is a small space, a black box studio and somewhat dimly lit at the best of times. The audience rows go only three rows back; it is the most intimate of performance spaces. It is also a genius […]

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