Bacchae at the Oxford Playhouse

Presenting a play entirely in Greek to a modern audience might seem like an extraordinary task, but through the interplay of choreography, music, and outstanding individual performances, this production of Euripides’ Bacchae carries it off effortlessly. The Oxford Greek Play is steeped in tradition, occurring every three years at the Oxford Playhouse, and yet for […]

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‘I, Marcus’: A Review

After a stunted night out, five teenagers wait indefinitely for a train. With nothing to do but sit on the platform, they exchange memories – but the reminiscence is just badly disguised ridicule. Everyone is forced to partake, lest the mockery should fall onto you, and so they scramble and tear into one another, into […]

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Review: 13 Reasons Why

Netflix’s latest hit series, 13 Reasons Why, has been making waves since its release on 31st March. Adapted from a YA novel of the same name, the show quickly became the platform’s ‘most-tweeted-about’ series of all time, despite (or perhaps thanks to) its coverage of dark subject matter – something that we will discuss later. […]

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In conversation with Flo Read

Flo Read graduated from Oxford last year, and has written numerous acclaimed plays which have been performed both nationally and internationally; Twin Primes won Best Production and Best Writing at the 2015 Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS) New Writing Festival, and Cold Warm went to the Edinburgh Fringe last year. She chats with Megan Husain […]

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Review: the beauty and suffering of Frankenstein

  This adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel ‘Frankenstein ‘s both emotionally gripping and beautifully put together. Nick Dear’s script is engaging and transports the gothic story to modern day issues of social ostracisation and the nature of love. The play opens dramatically with Frankenstein’s Creature, a repulsive and terrifying figure, writhing out of an […]

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Review – A Clockwork Orange

A Clockwork Orange is a challenging piece to adapt to stage, but it is tackled in an innovative way in this bold and captivating piece. From the very beginning of the play we are plunged into a world of violence and confusion. Greeted by a creepy Alex and his unnerving droogs, the audience is on […]

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Ghosts – A review

‘I’m like a walking corpse’ Ibsen isn’t known for his cheery plays. Yet ‘Ghosts’, on at the BT studio until Saturday, is something else altogether. It’s fascinating, disturbing, deeply complex, yes: these are all Ibsen characteristics. But with syphilis, near-incest, and euthanasia the subject-matter, along with Ibsen’s favourite, oppressive moral codes, ‘Ghosts’ is intense stuff. […]

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Antigone – A review

Antigone is the latest in a series of Greek tragedies put on in the New College Cloisters and directed by David Raeburn. His artistic vision and sense of exactly how he wanted to convey the original text were evident throughout. This year’s play followed on nicely from last year’s Oedipus Tyrannus, for those who had […]

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Oxford Revue – A review

People who say Oxford is no laughing matter are very much not the target audience of The Oxford Revue and Friends, Saturday night’s showcase for the city’s hottest up-and-coming comics. Also featuring appearances from the Leeds Tealights and the Cambridge Footlights, as well as hot new stand-up Phil Wang, the evening felt like a promise […]

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Ghosts- A preview

James Watts’ intense production promises to blow the dust off this 19th century classic. Using Eyre’s recent translation of the text, which abandons stilted period language for a striking modern tone, he’s opted for a minimalist approach to throw all the attention onto the story. Free from awkward Victoriana and cumbersome language, the play here […]

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