Oxford May Day: full steam ahead!

Image Description: May Morning celebrated by revellers costumed in leaves and greenery Oxford’s May Morning is a tradition which has contributed to the unique mythology and mysticism surrounding Oxford. The ancient festival of spring has been celebrated on 1st May for at least 1000 years—and crowds have gathered beneath Magdalen’s Great Tower for at least […]

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Reviewing the OBA

Sheltering from the midday sun, I was grateful for the shade provided by the Phoenix Picturehouse’s second screen. I sank down into the seat and felt my shirt cling to the upholstery. Two became one, as I did my best Comic Book Guy impression, minus oversized beverage and ponytail. Collecting my thoughts before the Oxford […]

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Zootropolis: The Difficulty of Using Animals as an Analogy for Race

If you’ve heard anything about Zootropolis (Zootopia in the U.S.), you’ve probably heard how ‘timely’ it is. In the wake of #BlackLivesMatter, Disney has released a kid-friendly film addressing racial profiling, pseudo-scientific racism and other issues of racial – or ‘species-ist’ – bias. Although I’m not sure what these critics would call an ‘untimely’ time […]

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Can’t buy me love?

Why the Beatles Still Deserve our Attention On 24th December last year, the Beatles released their back catalogue onto several major streaming platforms; they now sit in the 50 most listened-to artists on Spotify. Although they’re by no means threatening to challenge Justin Bieber’s hegemony over the charts, that’s an impressive figure for a band […]

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What’s the song and dance about?

  The musical in Oxford has a long and established tradition – with three or four fantastic productions being produced, choreographed, and in some cases even composed on a termly basis. Last term brought Oxford students the incredibly well received Chess, Sweeney Todd and the original musical In Her Eyes. Each offered something that pushed […]

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The Hollywood-isation of theatre?

  A cliché opening to this article would be to claim that literary adaptation for stage is currently ‘in vogue’, both in Oxford and (gasp) outside of it, on the evidence of recent high-profile productions of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and Headlong’s 1984 alongside student performances of Gawain and the Green […]

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