Manos, The Hands of Fate: a classic Bad Movie

The strange renaissance of the bad movie

Last year, professional oddball James Franco directed and starred in The Disaster Artist, a movie documenting the making of The Room (2003). Directed, written, and produced by, as well as starring, the mysterious Tommy Wiseau, The Room is mesmerizingly awful on every level, and was panned by every critic who saw it on its original […]

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Books on the Big Screen

The choice to entirely change a book’s plot might be controversial, but no reader can expect filmmakers to translate literature word for word onto the silver screen, nor can the author hope to have any creative role once the rights have been sold. Changes don’t necessarily do disservice to the original literature and its meaning, […]

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Oscars so Abled? The Overwhelming Frequency of Non-disabled Actors Portraying Disabled Characters

Ever since Dustin Hoffman won the Oscar for Best Actor playing Rain Man, half of Best Actor Oscars have been won by men playing characters with significant disability. The 2018 Academy Awards have recently graced our screens; including Eddie Redmayne’s Oscar-winning performance last year in The Theory of Everything as motor neurone disease (MND) sufferer […]

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Review: Isle of Dogs

I’m a big fan of Wes Anderson’s work, I won’t lie. Bearing that in mind, I approached the cinema for his latest, Isle of Dogs, with a lot of hope and yet some trepidation. Would he have lost his touch with his 9th film? Flashbacks to watching The Darjeeling Limited, a film that was undeniably […]

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Five Parisian cinemas that the filmmakers loved

In the 2012 World Cities Culture Report – an international survey examining the cultural offerings of twelve cities – it was revealed that Paris had the highest number of cinemas in the world at 302; almost three times that of London. This hardly comes as a surprise – France is widely considered the birthplace of […]

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Interview with Hugh Welchman

Loving Vincent is the world’s first fully painted feature film. Under the direction of husband-and-wife duo Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, 125 artists worked for six years to produce this animated biographical film about the life and mysterious death of Vincent van Gogh, primarily in the unique and instantly-recognisable painting style of the artist himself. […]

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Review: Three Billboards From Ebbing, Missouri

You’d be forgiven for mistaking Martin McDonagh’s latest work for a Coen brothers film. Many of the duo’s hallmarks are present, from the film’s dark tongue-in cheek humour and sharp moments of violence to the presence of the brilliantly blunt and snarky Frances McDormand. There’s also a hint of Tarantino in his razor-sharp dialogue, but […]

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mother!: Darren Aronofsky’s surrealist parable dividing the critics

At its premiere at the 74th Venice Film Festival, Darren Aronofsky’s latest film, mother!, simultaneously received both rapturous applause and boos from the audience. The response from critics and audiences alike has echoed that initial response: split between gushing praise and, at times, violent criticism. It is not hard to see why: this allegorical tale […]

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All You Need Is Lav: A Brief History of the Toilet in Cinema

Ah, the humble toilet. An essential mainstay of any standard household, yet often grossly underappreciated on the silver screen. For too long the proverbial privy has remained in the background in favour of its human users. So, to honour the noble loo, here are six of its most notable appearances. Psycho (1960) The toilet flushes […]

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Director’s Cut: Films You’re Dying to Watch….

It’s the scariest time of the year…no, not exam season, Halloween! Some of you will want to hide away beneath the covers, but for those of you bold enough or seeking the thrills of horror (and crazy enough to enjoy those films), the Oxford Student has some suggestions for your October movie repertoire – the […]

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Debate: What to Watch this Halloween

Terrible Horror Films By Dan Mahoney Halloween isn’t scary. It just isn’t. It’s silly and fun, more about pumpkins, cartoon skeletons and Scooby-Doo than it is about Michael Myers and actual horror. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but I find it hard to believe it’s a scary holiday when its most famous ritual […]

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