Manos, The Hands of Fate: a classic Bad Movie

The strange renaissance of the bad movie

Last year, professional oddball James Franco directed and starred in The Disaster Artist, a movie documenting the making of The Room (2003). Directed, written, and produced by, as well as starring, the mysterious Tommy Wiseau, The Room is mesmerizingly awful on every level, and was panned by every critic who saw it on its original […]

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Books on the Big Screen

The choice to entirely change a book’s plot might be controversial, but no reader can expect filmmakers to translate literature word for word onto the silver screen, nor can the author hope to have any creative role once the rights have been sold. Changes don’t necessarily do disservice to the original literature and its meaning, […]

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Oscars so Abled? The Overwhelming Frequency of Non-disabled Actors Portraying Disabled Characters

Ever since Dustin Hoffman won the Oscar for Best Actor playing Rain Man, half of Best Actor Oscars have been won by men playing characters with significant disability. The 2018 Academy Awards have recently graced our screens; including Eddie Redmayne’s Oscar-winning performance last year in The Theory of Everything as motor neurone disease (MND) sufferer […]

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Interview with Hugh Welchman

Loving Vincent is the world’s first fully painted feature film. Under the direction of husband-and-wife duo Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, 125 artists worked for six years to produce this animated biographical film about the life and mysterious death of Vincent van Gogh, primarily in the unique and instantly-recognisable painting style of the artist himself. […]

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Profile: Susanna White

BAFTA and Emmy-winning director Susanna White has worked with the best dramatic talent offered by British drama, from Sherlock’s Benedict Cumberbatch to Downton Abbey’s Maggie Smith. From BBC serials such as Bleak House and Jane Eyre, the HBO series Generation Kill, and feature film Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang, her filmography and career is […]

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Review: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Appropriately for the title, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 feels like something of a mixtape movie. Whilst the original very much had a driving narrative built around a magical macguffin, Vol. 2 feels a somewhat looser affair, built more around fun vignettes that although linked can feel fairly disparate. It’s a mixtape of jokes, […]

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Review: Beauty and the Beast

“Rediscover a tale as old as time,” ran the tagline of the extensive marketing campaign which accompanied this remake’s release. From the start, Disney have been aware of the sanctity of their source material; few animated films are so beloved or well-remembered as The Beauty and the Beast. The original is still the only animated […]

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Review: Arrival

Denis Villeneuve tends to be a filmmaker fixated by the darkness at the heart of humanity, with his previous works featuring such cheery themes as torture, the unending cycle of cartel violence and anti-feminist massacres. It’s something of a relief then to see him move to somewhat lighter territory in Arrival, a fundamentally hopeful and […]

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Review: Embrace of the Serpent

The film industry has had a long, and often clichéd, relationship with the Amazon rainforest. This vibrant land mass has formed the backdrop of only a small handful of recognisable narratives. We are now familiar with exploitative colonisers, adventurous treasure-hunters and threatening tribespeople. And in each portrayal of the rainforest, from Cannibal Holocaust to Fitzcarraldo, […]

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