Oxford University Professor shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize

The shortlist for the Wolfson History Prize 2019 was announced today with Oxford University Professor John Blair  one of the shortlisted authors. The prize celebrates the best historical non-fiction books in the UK. Blair’s work, Building Anglo-Saxon England, is a radical reinterpretation of the Anglo-Saxon world that draws on recent archaeological discoveries to reveal the […]

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The Pantomime – understanding this British festive tradition, its history, and its future

Image: Dick Whittington, The Oxford Playhouse. Credit: Geraint Lewis. Description: A Pantomime Dame. Acting, singing, dancing, and, perhaps most importantly, joking around; the Pantomime, a staple of the British festive theatre season, seemingly has it all. With that being said, I’ve always found myself wondering how the Pantomime got to become so popular, and why they […]

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Communicating robust science with Clive Cookson, the future of science journalism

Image Credit: Erica Yokoyama “In the current climate, where populism is attacking not only the political elite, anybody with an education is now being classified as an elite and it is particularly having impacts on things like art, theatre, and the sciences.” Last Friday, November 17th, these powerful introductory remarks struck those attending the lecture […]

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History Faculty abandons proposed changes to exam regulations

Image Credit: Photo © Jaggery (cc-by-sa/2.0) The History Faculty has recently U-turned on a decision to bring forward deadlines for thesis title submissions. The proposed changes were thought to be the solution to the time constraints felt by the Board of Examiners in finding examiners with appropriate expertise to mark theses. The faculty was required to consult students […]

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Review: Dunkirk

The stark image of English soldiers walking through the eponymous city before earth-shattering gunfire breaks out immediately sets us in the now-familiar world of Christopher Nolan. As in The Dark Knight, a group of men enter the scene together and are quickly picked off, with only a sole survivor left by its conclusion. His first […]

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Commemoration: are we remembering to forget?

George Santanya’s well-worn adage that “those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it” is uncontroversial, and the jewel of any prospective history student’s personal statement. Contemporary politics is not short of reminders that our collective memory of historical events wields immense influence in the present. From the resonance of ‘make America […]

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Mary Beard: Interview

Was there a particular moment when you discovered your passion for Ancient Roman history? Those moments are always mythical and mythologised, but I have vivid memories of when the ancient world (not so much the Roman world) first struck me.  I was five years old and had been taken to London, and to the British […]

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