Review: Astéronymes

Lolloping around Blackwells faced with the self-imposed challenge to put down the Byron and Lawrence and read more new poetry, the distorted blue henge on the front of Astéronymes immediately presented itself to me as an interesting read. Now, normally, this finely-tuned, well-honed book-selection technique really doesn’t go that well and leaves me feeling all […]

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To a Dog on the Beach

As you skid over pebbles and pad through the sea’s edge, you will not notice the piled clouds like mountains in China. You will not notice the shells which spell out incantations or the salt wind which whites them out. You could not predict you’d end up here. But the guesswork is not what matters. […]

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The Return

The Prodigal Son is facing the ground. The pictures are taken and he walks, slow across the courtyard, away from the sound of laughter. And now, no longer on show he undoes one button, puts his smile down, head in hands. Thoughts, his element, become a heavy burden. He shows in a frown his need […]

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Maud – A Review

‘Maud’ is probably my favourite poem in the English language ever. Tennyson often gets bashed even by the most academic types for being “too musical” or for being too patriotic in poems like ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’. Though these criticisms are extremely reductive, the one poem these critics have obviously not looked into […]

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Review: Dart

DART is a book-length poem by Alice Oswald, which is based on three years worth of recorded conversations with people who live and work on the River Dart. The result is a work that takes on the multitudinous voice and turbulent power of the river itself. This week, Grace Linden and Alice Troy-Donovan bring their […]

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Dear Elizabeth Previewed

In Sarah Ruhl’s play Dear Elizabeth, Chiasmus Productions have taken on a real challenge. Almost entirely comprised of letters between the great American poets Robert Lowell (played by Olivia Madin) and Elizabeth Bishop (Alex Sage), the play places an enormous burden on the actors playing the two. They have to bring what is essentially a […]

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