Donor backlash as St John’s embarks on a project to explore its colonial past

According to sources of The Telegraph, the President of St John’s College, Professor Maggie Snowing, is facing criticism from donors for supporting attempts to explore the college’s colonial past.  Benefactors of the college are thought to have threatened to withhold donations over the issue. The backlash has followed a job advert posted by the college […]

Continue Reading

Rhodes Must Fall Oxford inspires Bristol students’ campaign against Wills Memorial Building

Students at the University of Bristol have demanded that the Wills Memorial Building, housing the School of Law and Department of Earth Sciences, be renamed due to its namesake’s profiting from the slave trade. The campaign was inspired by the Oxford student-led initiative to pressure Oriel College into removing Cecil Rhodes’ statue from its position […]

Continue Reading

Rhodes Must Fall accuses university of “institutional neglect and indifference”

Supporters of the Rhodes Must Fall Oxford campaign gathered outside Oriel College at midday today to protest against institutionalised racism and the continued presence of the Cecil Rhodes statue. Around 40 protesters were present and called for increased representation of black students and black professors at the university, the “decolonisation” of the curriculum and an […]

Continue Reading

Chancellor Patten compares Rhodes Must Fall movement to Chinese government

In an opinion piece published by Project Syndicate, chancellor of Oxford University has compared the Rhodes Must Fall (RMF) movement with the Chinese government, arguing that both would display similar mechanisms of suppressing free expression and critical discourse. Western students should not abuse the freedoms bestowed upon them, freedoms that Chinese students have to fight for or barely know […]

Continue Reading

OUSU condemns Oriel over Rhodes statue

On the evening of Wednesday, 3 February, the Oxford University Student Union (OUSU) Council—Oxford’s highest decision-making body—voted to hold Oriel College accountable for its failure to follow through on its ‘listening campaign’ to Oxford students regarding the status of the Rhodes statue. The emergency motion, entitled ‘Holding Oriel College Accountable’, was proposed in light of […]

Continue Reading

Rhodes falls at the Oxford Union

On Tuesday, 19th January, the Oxford Union welcomed a full chamber to its first event of term: the highly anticipated panel discussion entitled ‘Must Rhodes Fall?’. The event brought together seven activists, academics, and journalists on either side of the controversial ‘Rhodes Must Fall’ movement. Local and national media, including Channel 4 News, were in […]

Continue Reading

YouGov results say Rhodes should stay

A Yougov survey conducted earlier this week found that 59% of respondents thought the statue of Cecil Rhodes on Oriel’s High Street facade should NOT be taken down. The survey, which gathered the views of the adult population via YouGov’s website on issues relating to the British Empire, presented the context of the debate surrounding […]

Continue Reading

The Rhodes statue – it’s all about location

It finally happened. Following months of protests, comment articles, arguments and counterarguments, the debate over the Oriel Rhodes statue has burst free from the Oxford bubble. For the first time the opinions of politicians and the public have entered into the limelight of this discussion. Yet amidst the debate’s new national, and even international, platform, […]

Continue Reading

Chancellor Patten dismisses Rhodes Must Fall movement in Vice-Chancellor admission

During this morning’s admission of Vice-Chancellor Richardson, Chancellor Patten, the ceremonial head of Oxford University, spoke out strongly in his welcome speech against historical revisionism in Oxford. Speaking before Professor Louise Richardson’s appointment, he stressed the need for both competitive public education spending and academic autonomy before moving on to criticise “intolerance” in universities. Chancellor […]

Continue Reading