Review: Hereafter

Life meets death meets virtual life in Hereafter, a new play by Chloë Taylor exploring the inhumane and even inhuman treatment of bereavement in the world of work. Eva (Martha Harlan) is grieving her dead husband when she is called in to work and asked by her boss with a sickening faux empathy to be […]

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The Oxford Imps on the art of improv

The Oxford Imps have been a fixture of the Oxford art scene since 2004, putting on a new performance each week at the Wheatsheaf on Oxford’s High Street, as well as a show each year at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Profile caught up with performers Dan Squire (DS) and Megan Morgan (MM) – who also […]

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Medea: a musically enchanting experience

Based on Robin Robertson’s translation of the Greek tragedy by Euripides, Khameleon Productions’ presentation of Medea was nothing short of brilliant. The all-BAME cast and crew brought new life to the myth. The revenge plot of the play, following Medea whose husband, Jason, has abandoned her and their children to marry the princess of the […]

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Review: NSFW at the Pilch

It is difficult to fault Lucy Kirkwood’s NSFW, a play that probes the depths of misogyny with an astute awareness of the painful sexism that journalism perpetuates, but also of the human action behind it. TheatreGoose’s production of the show at the Pilch treats its subject with flawlessly executed precision, wit and sensitivity, unpeeling layers […]

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Review: The White Devil

Stepping into the shadows of Jesus College’s candlelit hall on a sunny Saturday afternoon, the audience find themselves plunged into the equally shadowy world of 17th century Italy, the setting of Webster’s revenge-tragedy The White Devil. Vittoria Corombona, passionately played by Sophie Claypole, falls in love with the Duke of Bracciano (Basil Bowdler) and in […]

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Preview: Amy’s View

In the aisle of Jesus College chapel a few chairs, paintings, table and wine bottles invoke domesticity, setting the scene for Amy’s View by David Hare, this year’s Jesus College production. For a play in which the forces between theatre, television and reality are constantly negotiated it may not be surprising that the set is […]

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Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Brasenose presents ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, a transfixing production of Shakespeare’s most magical tale, staged in the beautiful New Quad for the college’s annual Arts Week. The performance has an airy touch, and a sense of genuine enjoyment underlies the play through the boundless energy of some astoundingly good actors, who shift seamlessly from scene […]

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Lady Gaga meets Brecht at the Old Fire Station

A Berlin Kabaret advertises itself as ‘Lady Gaga meets Brecht’ and a ‘Response to the Refugee Crisis’. It is underselling itself. It is neither of those things but something far more poignant. It is not a ‘response’ or a ‘reaction’ to one specific event. Even with its energy and vibrancy, the performance is never pushed […]

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Confusions: an ordinary Joe takes on a 70s comedy

(Spoilers ahead) Confusions… confusions? Sitting in the front row as the first of three one-act plays began to unfold in front of me, everyone on stage certainly seemed confused. Opening night nerves perhaps? Or more likely the beginning of a consistently engaging and hilarious portrayal of one of Alan Ayckbourn’s ‘greatest works’, or so I’m […]

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Review: Thoroughly Modern Millie

Thoroughly Modern Millie is as thoroughly delightful as ever. Now on tour, and having just graced Oxford’s New Theatre with a whole lot of jazz and sequins, it appears the classic Broadway show is still on top form. It is hardly surprising that this musical won six Tony awards, including best musical, as it is […]

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Hollywood moves to the West End

If all the world’s a stage… why is Hollywood moving to the West End? There is nothing more thrilling than live theatre. It is, unquestionably, the purest form of acting: it’s raw, it’s unedited, it’s immediate – both for the actor and the audience. There’s the unmistakable adrenaline rush that only a round of applause […]

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From Travesties to Triumphs

Switzerland is anything but a state of neutrality in Tom Stoppard’s Travesties, as art and war wrangle with each other to prove their significance, and revolutions of all kind loom over the lives of its intelligentsia. But is it the revolution of art or of the proletariat that will inhabit a more significant role in […]

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Preview: Travesties

  Travesties, by Tom Stoppard, is largely set in Zurich in the middle of the First World War. The turbulence of the period, reflected in a chaotic cast of characters swirling around British diplomat Henry Carr – a somewhat self-centred and unremarkable man, playing counterpoint to the larger-than-life figures of James Joyce, Tristan Tzara, and […]

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